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NERC CE

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Course Title Hours Price

The objective of this course is to present and discuss the many factors involved in commissioning new power installations, placing particular emphasis on the testing of protective schemes. Participants should be able to understand the following overall concepts and apply them to their work activities.

2 $65

The purpose of this course is to present protection schemes that are used to assist in maintaining system stability. The concept of steady – state operation and dynamic response is demonstrated with particular reference to the power angle curve. The physical consequences of instability are also discussed. The participants should be able to understand the following overall concepts and be able to apply them to their day – to – day work activities.

2 $65

The purpose of this course is to familiarize participants with the principles of pilot protection, the various schemes used and the different types of communication channels employed. The participant should be able to understand the following overall concepts and apply them to their day – to – day work activities.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to present the broad categories of line configuration and discuss the various types of protection schemes that are employed. Particular attention is paid to coordination for selective tripping and isolation of faulty circuits. Participants should be able to understand the following overall concepts and apply them to their day – to – day work activities.

2 $65

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the participant with the features of motor operation and the most common types of protective devices that are installed. Participants should be able to understand the following overall concepts and apply them to their day – to – day work activities.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to review the different bus layouts that are used in power systems and to present the different protection schemes that are installed to protect against bus faults. The participant should be able to understand the following overall concepts and apply them to day – to – day work activities.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to review the types of faults that can occur in transformers and to present the different protection schemes that are installed on large and small transformers. Participants should be able to understand the following overall concepts and apply them to their day – to – day work activities.

2 $65

This course introduces students to the subject of protective relays as they apply to generation sources in the electric power system. The course includes discussions of various generation schemes, generator grounding issues, backup protection schemes for generators, and the impacts of harmonics on generator protection. In addition, the course details how both electromechanical and digital relays are employed in providing various types of problem/fault detection and protection.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to discuss the characteristics of different types of faults, and their effects on the power system. Knowledge of this material is vital to understanding the protective schemes that are presented in future courses. Participants should be able to understand the following overall concepts and apply them to day – to – day work activities.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to present concepts which are vital tools in the interpretation of system operating conditions. The participant should be able to understand the following overall concepts and apply them to day – to – day work activities.

2 $65

This course introduces the student to various applications of protective relays (bus protection, line protection, transformer protection) as well as types of protective relays (instantaneous overcurrent, time overcurrent, undervoltage, electromechanical, digital).

The course uses many images from the power system, including images of transformers, substations, protective relays, and relay panels. In addition, there are multiple videos depicting protective relay and equipment movement, as well as simulations and animations that lead the student through the various application and fault scenarios.

2 $65

This course provides an overview of the function of protection schemes, including general protection philosophy and its impact on the operation of the system. The participant should be able to understand the following overall concepts and apply them to day – to – day work activities.

2 $65

In this course, you will learn about the NERC requirements concerning voltage control.

Voltage control plays a substantial role in determining the success of electrical operations. It is important to study voltage relationships and the impact of these relationships on various types of electrical systems that are handling various types of voltages.

2 $65

This course is an introduction to the concepts of underfrequency and undervoltage. During this lesson you will learn to relate these concepts to NERC and regional coordinating authority standards. You will test your knowledge of these relationships in several quizzes.

By the end of this lesson you will understand the different roles and relationships that underfrequency and undervoltage maintain in many workplace practices.

2 $65

Synchronizing islands is critical to system restoration. In this course you will learn how islanding occurs, how to synchronize islands, and how to handle underfrequency and undervoltage occurrences in electrical systems.

You will also review NERC standards and their relevance to the control and restoration of an island.

2 $65

Safety requires a particular frame of mind, a personal commitment, an awareness, and full safety compliance, based upon knowledge, training, and experience. The safety of employees and field personnel, and even the safety of the public, depend upon your conscientious and disciplined use of safe work practices in all of your day – to – day operations.

This course provides an overview of high – voltage power – system operations and will allow you to engage with the material by participating in training exercises requiring the application of system operating knowledge.

2 $65

This course emphasizes the importance of clear communication and coordination while carrying out emergency operations. As you proceed through this course, you will be asked to reflect on the outlined concepts and apply those concepts to the real – world examples provided throughout each lesson.

This course covers emergency operations as well as applicable key NERC Standards and is intended for training purposes.

4 $85

Effective monitoring and management of control performance is the cornerstone of reliability. It is important to be able to understand and apply both NERC and regional standards as they apply to control performance requirements.

This course is intended as a review of NERC Control Performance requirements. The concepts and applications presented throughout the course will familiarize you with each policy and standard.

4 $85

The objective of this course is to draw attention to inspection requirements, which are similar for most types of gas turbines although mechanical details may be different.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to present the nature and purpose of different modes of maintenance, i.e. running, predictive, and preventive maintenance.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to highlight the main features of the aero – derivative type of gas turbine, drawing attention in particular to the difference when compared with the heavier industrial machines.

4 $85

The objective of this course is to present the features of control and protection systems as used on gas turbine installations. The previous tape GT 3 dealt with operating parameters and potential hazards thus laying the groundwork for study of control and protection devices.

4 $85

The objective of this course is to present the factors involved in operation of the gas turbine generating unit, including typical procedures for start – up and shut – down of the unit. On – load operation is discussed with particular emphasis on operating hazards and limitation. The course generally focuses on the heavy industrial type gas turbine. Aero – derivatives are discussed in detail in course number five in the series.

4 $85

The objective of this course is to present and discuss features of the various support systems and auxiliaries that are necessary for operation of the gas turbine. Both ON – BASE and OFF – BASE equipment is studied. Note that the design of the support systems varies according to the size and purpose of the gas turbine unit. Aeroderivative machines are discussed in a separate course.

2 $65

The objective of this course, the first in the GAS TURBINE series, is to present the main construction and design features of gas turbines as used for power generation. Basic cycles are discussed, and different sizes and machine layouts are presented.

2.5 $85

This course presents the main features and advantages of PLCs, including hardware arrangements, software (i.e. programming) and typical applications. Extension of the PLC is discussed, noting features of a typical distributed control system.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to draw attention to the many factors that affect the accuracy of testing on protection circuits and equipment. Fundamental testing techniques are presented along with a discussion of the pitfalls to be avoided. A demonstration on the use of the oscilloscope is included. The need for specific safety precautions is also discussed.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to present the concepts on which fault calculations are made. Both balanced and non – balanced faults are discussed, including phase – to – phase and phase – to – ground faults. The use of ‘percent impedance’ is shown and the use of symmetrical components is discussed.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to draw attention to the problem of inadvertent trips and misoperation of protection equipment. Typical case studies are presented, with the conclusions leading to recommended procedures to help reduce inadvertent trips.

2 $65

This course will discuss the application of SCADA systems (EMS, and DISTRIBUTION AUTOMATION), and present the main features of modern installations including equipment layout, communications, operations and maintenance.

2 $65

The purpose of this course is to continue the discussion of telecommunications protection. While course 2119 presented protection devices, this course focuses on specific installation practice and typical configurations. Participants should be able to understand the following overall concepts and apply them to their day – to – day activities.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to draw attention to the high voltage hazards that can occur on telecommunication circuits entering substations and power stations, and to review the protection devices that are used to combat this problem. Participants should be able to understand the following overall concepts and apply them to their day – to – day activities.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to present and discuss supervision of the hydro generator including control, monitoring, and protection. Included is a review of the significance of active and reactive power output from the generator.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to present and discuss supervision of the hydro generator including control, monitoring, and protection. Included is a review of the significance of active and reactive power output from the generator.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to present and discuss supervision of the hydro generator including control, monitoring, and protection. Included is a review of the significance of active and reactive power output from the generator.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to introduce and present the major features of static relaying, including analog – type solid – state relays and digital microprocessor relays. At this stage in the program, it is assumed that all participants are thoroughly familiar with the functions and characteristics of the different types of relays. This course focuses upon the differences between solid state and electromechanical relays.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to demonstrate the various methods that are used to investigate equipment performance during fault conditions. While various types of fault recorders are considered, particular emphasis is placed upon the interpretation of oscillograms.

2 $65

This course presents a more detailed examination of power line carrier (PLC) systems. Earlier courses looked at the protection schemes that employ PLC as the communication medium. This course focuses upon the PLC equipment itself.

2 $65

This course introduces the student to the concepts and practices of system voltage control as related to the high – voltage transmission of electrical power. The course focuses on the impacts of transmission line loading and voltage control equipment.

2 $65

This course introduces the student to the concepts and practices involved in high voltage transmission of electrical power. The course focuses on transmission lines, substation equipment, and transformers.

2 $65

This course introduces the student to the basic concepts needed to understand power flows and generation within the bulk electric system. The course includes basic electrical concepts such as Ohm’s law as it relates to the transfer of electricity from one location to another. In addition, materials are presented to familiarize the student with the actual production of alternating current (AC) electricity.

2 $65

Once the generator is synchronized and on line, it locks itself in and remains in synchronism unless an abnormal condition occurs. Our discussion of electric power so far has involved voltages and currents being generated in single – phase operation, but electric power is normally generated, transmitted, and distributed in the form of three – phase power, as discussed here.

2 $65

While it is true that the larger the impedance, the larger the regulation for any given amount of load, what is meant by saying that a transformer is perfect or ideal? Why does the inductive reactance of the transformer occur? And what happens to the secondary voltage if the load is removed?.

In this part, you will calculate impedance and voltage drop across the various elements of a circuit; study the effects a change in the power factor can have on the active, reactive, and apparent power demands of a load; describe what happens when a capacitor is placed across the terminals of a motor, and discuss how to increase load transfer along a line.

2 $65

In this part the discussion turns to methods that can be used to produce a DC voltage and suggests why AC voltage is easier to handle; how a rotating magnetic field induces voltage and current into the stator winding and what a stator is. It also distinguishes between RMS values and maximum values and names which is used most often and for what end.

2 $65

Over the last century or so, electricity has become an increasingly important and integral part of our daily lives. Knowledge of the fundamentals of electricity and application is increasingly necessary not only for those of us who work in the electric power industry, but also for the general public.

In this four – module program on electrical fundamentals, we introduce for study the general physics or basic natural laws that govern the use of electricity. This material will serve as a solid foundation on which to build the more advanced concepts dealt with in our many other training programs.

In presenting this material, we have tried to limit mathematics and complicated calculations, preferring instead to demonstrate concepts by the use of powerful animated graphics. However, we cannot dispense with calculations altogether, so please stick with us; this material does get more and more interesting as we proceed.

This part answers such questio.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to present and discuss supervision of the hydro generator including control, monitoring, and protection. Included is a review of the significance of active and reactive power output from the generator.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to examine, from the operational point of view, the various items of electrical equipment that are commonly installed in the hydro – electric power plant. The course covers switchyard equipment, station service supply, DC power supply, and uninterruptible AC power supply. Safety of personnel and equipment is also discussed.

4 $85

The objective of this course is to present and discuss supervision of the hydro generator including control, monitoring, and protection. Included is a review of the significance of active and reactive power output from the generator.

1.5 $65

The objective of this course is to present and discuss supervision of the hydro generator including control, monitoring, and protection. Included is a review of the significance of active and reactive power output from the generator.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to present and discuss the major constructional features of the hydro generator. A review of AC generation fundamentals is also included, as this is considered necessary for complete understanding.

4 $85

The objective of this course is to present and discuss types of equipment used to monitor and control the operation of the hydro turbine. Typical examples of mechanical hydraulic and electro hydraulic actuators are demonstrated plus monitoring and protection devices.

4 $85

The objective of this course is to present and discuss the structural and functional features of different types of hydro turbines. Certain operational considerations are also presented such as cavitation, tailrace elevation, surge, run away speed, etc.

1.5 $65

The purpose of this course is to present and discuss all of the functions involving the use and control of water in a hydro – electric scheme. The importance of hydrological records is discussed in relation to hydro power plant planning and operation, and reservoir control.

4 $85

The objective of this course is to introduce the major components of a typical hydro electric power station. A brief overview of each item of equipment is presented noting that detailed study will be shown in subsequent courses in the series. Basic hydraulic principles are also presented as an aid to better understanding of hydro plant operation.

4 $85

The objective of this course, the first in the Hydro – Electric Power Series, is to give hydro power plant operators and technicians an understanding of the role of hydro – electric power in the overall power system. The characteristics of different types of hydro plants are briefly discussed in relation to their effect on power system operation. An overview of the power system is presented plus a review of the tasks and responsibilities of the power dispatcher and power system operators.

4 $85

The objective of this course is to draw attention to important operating parameters of the POWER GENERATOR. A review of fundamentals is included as an aid to understanding the significance of generator control.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to continue the discussion on combined cycle installations with particular focus upon the HRSG, and associated condensate and feed systems.

2 $65

The objective for this course is to present the main features of the Gas Turbine Combined Cycle, as employed for ‘Power Generation’, and ‘Co – Generation’ (process steam of gas to industry) The most common types of configurations are presented along with an examination of typical steam turbine arrangements. Operation and control of the combined unit is also discussed in some detail, with the exception of the HRSG which is demonstrated in course 2509.

4 $85

The objective of this course is to present the basic power plant cycle and discuss the energy conversions that take place throughout the cycle. The cycle and various efficiency considerations will be shown on two types of heat energy diagrams: the Mollier diagram and the Temperature – Entropy diagram.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to present the basic power plant cycle and the energy conversions that take place throughout the cycle. The effect that various parameters have on the cycle efficiency are also discussed.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to present and discuss techniques of liquid analysis in order to collect data for condition monitoring of equipment. In particular insulating oils, lube oils, and water analysis are dealt with. After completion of this module, the participant should be able to understand and apply the following concepts in day – to – day activities.

1.5 $65

The objective of this course is to present and discuss the types of electrical tests being performed today for condition monitoring of large high voltage equipment such as generators and transformers. This includes “off – line” and “on – line” testing. The participant should be able to understand the following concepts, and employ these in work activities.

1.5 $65

The objective of this course is to present an overview of different types of NDE testing techniques which are performed on mechanical equipment. Various techniques are demonstrated, noting their suitability for identifying particular types of material defects and degradation.

4 $85

The objective of this course is to provide an understanding of vibration in machinery, including modes of vibration measurement. Typical examples of vibration analysis are presented, plus an introduction to the technique of balancing.

4 $85

The objective of this course is to present and discuss supervision of the hydro generator including control, monitoring, and protection. Included is a review of the significance of active and reactive power output from the generator.

4 $85

The objective of this course, the first in the series on Condition Monitoring, is to focus attention on the overall maintenance task, the different levels of maintenance required, and the development of Predictive Maintenance with its attendant need for ‘condition monitoring’.

4 $85

This course stresses information dealing with a number of issues related to the transfer of energy on the power system as well as the background necessary to fully understand interchange schedules that result from transaction tags established by PSEs. During the latter portions of the course, you will review the provisions of NERC Standard IRO – 004, which deal with planning for system operation during both normal and emergency conditions and during system restoration. Finally, you will review NERC’s requirements for reliability coordinators as set out in Standard EOP – 006.

4 $85

This course deals with aspects of NERC TOP and VAR Standards of control area transmission, operations, coordination and voltage, and reactive control. This course will include information on NERC EOP Standards concerning emergency operations with specific reference to TOP – 002 concerning the planning requirements for emergency operations and transmissions operations. This course emphasizes the importance of reviewing each NERC Standard with the assumption that particular attention be given to a review of those NERC Standards covered in each segment of the course.

4 $85

This course covers aspects of generation control. Performance is discussed throughout, and analysis shows how the application of relevant NERC Standards pertains to specific aspects of system control.

4 $85

The objective of System Control is to bring about an orderly flow of power from the generating source to the load (power consumer) while maintaining the utmost level of safety, reliability, and stability throughout the system. This course discusses the requirements and procedures of System Control and the relationships of these requirements and procedures to applicable NERC Standards.

4 $85

This course provides a general overview of the purpose of deregulation in the electric utility industry in North America.

2 $65

This course provides the student with a broad overview of protective relaying as relates to the transmission system. It also provides basic information on the input measurements that must take place for protective relays to perform correctly and to not operate at unintended times.

2 $65

This course gives the student an overview of the ways in which electric utilities monitor events on and the status of the transmission system, and how communication of needed information takes place.

2 $65

This course gives the student an overview of the events that take place during a blackout situation that requires system restoration. These events include the necessary preparations and precautions that must be taken to minimize the time and magnitude of any blackout, as well as the steps that should be taken to prepare the system for restoration.

2 $65

This course covers a variety of abnormal electric system operating conditions, and their implications. The student will learn about faults on the system, loss of generation, equipment – specific problems, and interchange emergencies.

2 $65

This course exposes the student to methods for responding to system events and emergencies. The student will learn about power flows, stability, and interconnections, as well as corrective and emergency actions.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to present and discuss the various factors that must be taken into consideration when dispatching generation. Although most of the technical factors will remain after deregulation, it is probable that some aspects of dispatching will change to accommodate the competitive market for generation. This subject will be dealt with later in the program.

2 $65

This course describes the methods and problems encountered when trying to control transmission system frequency. Topics covered include Frequency Concepts, Control of Frequency, Tie – Line Control, and Automatic Generation Control (AGC).

2 $65

This course contains information pertaining to the Air Pollution Control System, which is an important component of the Control Operator Training Program.

During this course, you will be introduced to the System through a series of lessons describing the inner workings of a typical Air Pollution Control System and its associated controls.

Always review specific plant start – up and operating procedures for proper operation of systems and equipment..

Learning Objectives

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain the functions of the air pollution control system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the air pollution control system flow path.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the principle of operation of the baghouse.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the principle of operation of the scrubber.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain major components of the air pollution control system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how the pebble lime feedstock is transferred to the lime feed bins.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the components of the lime preparation portion of the scrubber system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how lime milk is produced in the ball mill.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the operation of a typical spray scrubber used to remove sulfur dioxide from the flue gas.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the method by which the filter bags in the baghouse are cleaned.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain component controls for the air pollution control system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe two conditions that result in automatic shutdown of pebble lime transfer blowers.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain valves that are used in the operation of the scrubber atomizer.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe why the baghouse bypass damper is kept open until the temperature of the flue gas is greater than the dew point.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the condition that indicates that baghouse cleaning is required.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain the process controls of the air pollution control system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how the operator controls the ratio of lime solids to slaking water as measured in the lime – milk storage tank.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the interlocks associated with the lime – to – water ratio controller, any of which if “true” can trip the feeder.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain how to operate the air pollution control system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe support systems that must be in – service before starting the air pollution control system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain steps that need to be taken to start the baghouse.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe actions and checks that the operator needs to make during normal operation of the air pollution control system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain steps that need to be taken to shutdown the air pollution control system.

Lesson 1: Air Pollution Control System Function

  • Air Pollution Control System Function
  • Air Pollution Control System Flow Path

Lesson 2: Air Pollution Control System Major Components

  • Lime Storage
  • Lime Preparation
  • Scrubber Atomizer
  • Baghouse

Lesson 3: Air Pollution Control System Component Controls

  • Lime Transfer Blower Controls
  • Lime Feed Bin Vent Fan
  • Bin Activator
  • Ball Mill Slaker Auto Sequence Controls
  • SDA Damper Controls
  • Atomizer Controls
  • Baghouse Damper Controls
  • Baghouse Reverse Air Fan Control
  • Baghouse Cleaning Cycle Selector/Control

Lesson 4: Boiler Fuel System Process Controls

  • Lime Feeder IC Controls
  • Lime – to – Water Ratio Controller

Lesson 5: Air Pollution Control System Operation

  • Startup Prerequisites
  • System Startup
  • Normal Operation
  • System Shutdown Operations
1.5 $65

This course contains information about the boiler fuel system. A typical boiler fuel system and its associated controls are described in this course.

In this course, you will study important topics related to the boiler fuel system such as its function, flow path, major components, component controls, and status indicators.

Always review specific plant start – up and operating procedures for proper operation of systems and equipment.

Learning Objectives

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain the function of the boiler fuel system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe functions of the fuel oil igniters.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain how the primary air flow and pulverizer outlet temperature are controlled.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the purpose of the fuel oil igniter scanners located in the burner assembly.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain functions of auxiliary air dampers.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe functions of the burner management system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the purpose of the furnace purge system.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain components and controls for the boiler fuel system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe two situations that require a boiler purge to be performed.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee, when presented with a DCS graphic for the fuel oil burner supply pump controls, shall identify buttons that switch the pumps between “auto” and “manual” operation.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee, when presented with the DCS screen for the warm – up burner operating status, shall identify status indications for the burner oil valve position.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain unsafe operating conditions that initiate a master fuel trip.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee, when shown a control graphic for a unit pulverizer, shall identify permissives that must be satisfied before the pulverizer may be placed in – service.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe conditions that cause a warm – up burner trip.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain system controllers of the boiler fuel system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee, when presented with the display graphic for the miscellaneous fuel control, shall identify the key process variable indications.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the purpose of the inerting steam supplied to pulverizers.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe controls that appear in the total fuels control system display.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee, when presented with the graphic for the total fuel master control, shall identify tools (i.e., buttons) used to access historical data from the trend graph.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe which support systems should be in – service prior to starting the boiler fuel system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the process for removing the boiler fuel system from service during a unit shutdown.

Lesson 1: Boiler Fuel System Function

  • Boiler Fuel System
  • Fuel Oil System Flow Path
  • Ignitor Oil Flow
  • Warm – Up Oil Flow
  • Coal Flow
  • Typical Five Elevation Burner Assembly Layout
  • Fuel and Auxiliary Air Dampers
  • Major Components
  • Coal Feeders
  • Pulverizers
  • Burner Assemblies
  • Fuel Air Dampers
  • Auxiliary Air Dampers
  • Overfire Air Dampers
  • Flame Scanner
  • Burner Management System Requirements
  • Warm – Up Gun Assembly
  • Burner Management System Functions
  • Burner Management Overview Screen
  • Furnace Purge System
  • Master Fuel Trip
  • Boiler Monitoring System
  • Flame Scanner
  • Scanner Air Fans
  • Furnace Cameras

Lesson 2: Components and Controls

  • Component Controls

Unit Boiler Purge Controls

  • Burner Management Overview Screen
  • Primary Purge Permits

Secondary Purge Permits

  • Purge Permit Detail Chart
  • Fuel Oil Burner Supply Pump Controls
  • Fuel Oil Burner Supply Pump Startup
  • Ignitor Oil Header Controls
  • Warm – up Oil Header Controls
  • Permissives Required to Start Warm – Up Burners
  • Warm – up Elevations AB Controls
  • Elevation Start/Stop Button
  • AB1 Start Sequence/Status
  • Warm – up Burner Operating Status
  • Burner Management Overview Screen
  • Master Fuel Trip
  • Primary Air Fans
  • PA Fan Start Sequence
  • PA Fan Stop and Tagout
  • PA Fan Process Trips
  • Unit Pulverizer Controls
  • Feeder Start Permissives
  • Pulverizer Startup

Lesson 3: System Controllers

  • Boiler Fuel System Process Control
  • Miscellaneous Fuel Controls
  • Fuel Oil Supply Pressure Controls
  • Warm – Up Oil Flow Controls
  • Pulverizer Inerting Steam Pressure Controller
  • Inerting Steam Trend Graphic
  • Pulverizer Manual/Auto Controls
  • Feeder Rate Control
  • Trend Graphic
  • Pulverizer Hot Air Damper Controls
  • Pulverizer Cold Air Damper
  • Total Fuels Display Controls
  • Boiler Master
  • Total Fuel Master
  • Startup – Purge Permissives
  • Start the Purge
  • Pulverizer Air Flow
  • Start The Feeder
2.5 $85

This course contains information pertaining to the combustion air and flue gas system.

During this course, you will be introduced to the combustion air and flue gas system through a series of lessons describing the inner workings of a typical combustion air and flue gas system and its associated controls.

Always review specific plant start – up and operating procedures for proper operation of systems and equipment..

Learning Objectives

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain the function of the combustion air and flue gas system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how airflow through forced draft (FD) fans in the combustion air system is controlled.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain composition of typical flue gases.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the function of induced draft (ID) fans located in the flue gas system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain status indications for major items of equipment in the system, when shown a graphic display of the combustion air and flue gas system.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain major components of the combustion air and flue gas system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how secondary air heaters operate to transfer heat from the flue gas to the cold air stream entering the boiler.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the purpose of the heated primary air.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe indications for the fan operating status, when presented with a graphic display for the ID fan.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain component controls of a combusted air and flue gas system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the controls for the primary and secondary air heaters, when presented with a DCS air heater motor control system display.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the purpose of the jacking oil pump associated with the ID fan.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the reason why the ID fan controls are found on a boiler control screen including the furnace pressure master.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain permissives that must be met to allow the fan to be started, when shown a FD fan control screen.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe primary air fan process trips on a graphic display of the primary air fan control.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain process controls of the combusted air and flue gas system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the furnace pressure master control block, when presented with a graphic display for the furnace pressure control.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain how the airflow master controller functions to provide the required combustion air to the boiler.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the purpose of the FD fan inlet vanes.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain conditions under which cold end corrosion of the air heaters can occur.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the control block that relates to the primary air heater demand, when presented with a DCS graphic of the air heater gas damper control.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain the operation of the combusted air and flue gas system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the support systems that need to be in service prior to startup of the combustion air and flue gas system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the process for starting an ID fan on turning gear.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain three conditions that the operator should monitor and confirm during normal operation of the combustion air and flue gas system
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the level of furnace total air flow that must be maintained until the furnace is sufficiently cooled.

Lesson 1: Combustion Air and Flue Gas System Function

  • Combustion Air and Flue Gas System Function
  • Simplified Combustion Air System Flow Path
  • Flue Gas System Flow Path
  • Combustion Air and Flue Gas Graphic
  • Boiler Air and Gas Temperature Graphic

Lesson 2: Major Components of the Combustion Air and Flue Gas System

  • Forced Draft (FD) Fans
  • Steam Coil Air Heaters
  • Secondary Air Preheaters
  • Primary Air (PA) Fans
  • Induced Draft (ID) Fans

Lesson 3: Components Controls

  • Primary and Secondary Air Heater Drive Controls
  • Secondary Air Heater Fire Protection Valves Controls
  • ID Fan Turning Gear Controls
  • Induced Draft (ID) Fan Controls
  • Forced Draft (FD) Fan Controls
  • Primary Air (PA) Fan Controls
  • CCOFA and SOFA Damper Controls
  • Auxiliary Air Damper Controls

Lesson 4: Combustion Air and Flue Gas System Process Control

  • Furnace Pressure Controls
  • ID Fan Inlet Vane Controls
  • Air Flow Master
  • FD Fan Inlet Vane Controls
  • Steam Coil Air Heater Air Temperature Controls
  • Steam Coil Air Heater Drain Receiver Level Controls
  • Air Heater Gas Damper Controls

Lesson 5: Combustion Air and Flue Gas System Operation

  • Start – up Prerequisites
  • System Start – up
  • Normal Operation
  • System Shutdown
4 $85

This course contains information pertaining to the boiler water and steam system.

During this course, you will be introduced to this system through a series of lessons describing the inner workings of a typical boiler water and steam system and its associated controls.

Important: Always review specific plant start – up and operating procedures for proper operation of systems and equipment.

Learning Objectives

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain how the boiler water and steam system function.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the function of the boiler water system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the process by which the reheat steam is produced.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the term saturated steam.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain how the outlet temperature of reheat steam is controlled.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain major components of the boiler water and steam system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the four main components of the boiler water system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain how heat is transferred from the furnace flue gas to the boiler water in the economizer.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee, when shown a DCS graphic display for the steam drum, shall describe key process variables.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain consequences of inadequate circulation of boiler water through the boiler water walls.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe cooling water systems associated with the boiler circulating water pumps.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the type of heat transfer occurring within the primary and secondary sections of the superheater.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain component controls of the boiler water and steam system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe permissives that must be met before the boiler circulating water pump can be started.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain a control graphic for a boiler circulating water pump and indications for equipment status and process variables.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the normal operating configuration for the cooling water booster pumps.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain which steam drain lines open automatically on a turbine trip and which are operator controlled.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the purpose of the economizer recirculating valve.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain process controls for the boiler water and steam system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe when the boiler drum blowdown valve is used.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the function of the superheat outlet steam temperature control.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how changing the burner tilts affects the reheat steam temperature.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain indications showing the setpoint and measured reheat steam temperatures.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain how to operate the boiler water and steam system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe pre – conditions that must be met before the boiler water and steam system is started.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain guidelines for the use of turbine turning gear prior to bringing a unit on – line.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe five actions that the operator must take prior to firing the boiler.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain operating parameters the operator should monitor during normal operation.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe temperature conditions that must exist before the boiler feed pumps can be shutdown.

Lesson 1: Boiler Water and Steam System Function

  • Boiler Water and Steam System
  • Simplified Boiler Water System Flow – path
  • Main Steam System Simplified Flow – path
  • Reheat Steam System Simplified Flow – path

Lesson 2: Major Components of the Boiler Water and Steam System

  • Boiler Water System Components
  • Main Steam System Components
  • Reheat Steam System Components

Lesson 3: Component Controls

  • Boiler Circulating Water Pump Controls Cooling Water Booster Pump Controls
  • Superheat Spray Block Valve Controls
  • Reheat Spray Block Valve Controls
  • Drain Controls
  • Economizer Recirculation Controls

Lesson 4: Boiler Water and Steam System Process Control

  • Drum Blowdown Controls
  • Drum Level Control
  • Superheat Outlet Steam Temperature Controls
  • Reheat Temperature and Burner Tilt Controls

Lesson 5: Boiler Water and Steam System Operation

  • Start – up Prerequisites
  • System Start – up
  • Normal Operation
  • System Shutdown
3 $85

This course of the Control Operator Training Program concerns boiler feed pumps.

During this course, you will learn about the function of the boiler feed pump, the major components and flow – path of the boiler feed pumps, the boiler feed pump systems, and other important information related to boiler feed pumps.
Important: Always review specific plant start – up and operating procedures for proper operation of systems and equipment.

Note: In this course we will be using motors as the driving element of the feed pump, but turbines are also employed in many plants.

Learning Objectives

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain the boiler feed pump and its flow path.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the main functions and features of a boiler feed pump.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the main valves associated with the feedwater flow path.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe major features of the boiler feed pump lube oil system.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain the major components of boiler feed pumps.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe a graphic display of the feedwater system and indications pertaining to equipment status and key process variables.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the boiler feed pump lube oil system and its major components.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the functioning of the main oil coolers used in the lube oil system of the boiler feed pumps.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the purpose of the hydraulic coupling which connects the motor shaft to the pump shaft.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the purpose of the boiler feed pump seal water system.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain the controls associated with the boiler feed pump lube oil pump.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe a graphic display of the boiler feed pump control and the permissives required for startup of the feed pump.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain actions to be performed before startup of the boiler feed pump.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the function of the feedwater block valve.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain process controls associated with boiler feed pumps.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how the lube oil temperature of the boiler feed pump is controlled.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain how the temperature of the seal water used in boiler feed pumps is controlled.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe a graphic of the startup feedwater valve control and indications for the measured variable and the setpoint.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain how the feedwater pump discharge flow is controlled.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain the operation of the boiler feed pump system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the prerequisites needed for the startup of the boiler feed pump system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the four main preparations for startup that should be verified by the operator before the feed pump system is started.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the feed pump motor data to be monitored as the feedwater system comes on – line.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain parameters that should be monitored during normal operation of the boiler feed pump system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the orderly shutdown of the feedwater system.

Lesson 1: Boiler Feed Pump Function and Flow – path

  • Boiler Feed Pump Function
  • Simplified Feedwater Flow – path
  • Boiler Feed Pump Balance Piston Leak – off
  • Boiler Feed Pump Recirculation Valves
  • Boiler Feed Pump Discharge Valves
  • Start – up Valve
  • Feedwater Block Valve
  • Lube Oil System Flow – path
  • AC Lube Oil Pumps
  • Main Oil Coolers
  • Fluid Drive
  • Emergency Oil Pump
  • Auxiliary Oil Cooler
  • Motor and Pump Bearings

Seal Water

Lesson 2: Major Components of Boiler Feed Pumps

  • Major Components
  • Boiler Feed Pumps
  • Feedwater System Display
  • Boiler Feed Pump Lube Oil System
  • Lube Oil Pumps
  • Seal Water System

Lesson 3: Component Controls

  • Boiler Feed Pump Lube Oil Pump Controls
  • Boiler Feed Pump Oil System Alarms and Trips
  • Boiler Feed Pump Controls
  • Discharge Valve Control
  • Feedwater Block Valve Controls

Lesson 4: Boiler Feed Pump Controls

  • Process Controls
  • Lube Oil Temperature Control
  • Seal Water Temperature Control
  • Seal Water Control

Start – up Feedwater Valve Controls

  • Start – up Feedwater Valve Trends
  • Feedwater Pump Discharge Flow Controller
  • Feedwater Master

Lesson 5: Boiler Feed Pump System Operations

  • Start – up Prerequisites
  • Feedwater System Start – up
  • Boiler Feed Pump Start – up
  • Boiler Feed Pump Start
  • Normal Operation
  • System Shutdown
3 $85

This course contains information pertaining to the Feedwater System, which is an important component of Control Operator Training Program.

During this course, you will be introduced to the Feedwater System through a series of lessons describing the inner workings of a typical Feedwater System and its associated controls.

Always review plant specific startup and operating procedures for proper operation of systems and equipment.

Learning Objectives

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall describe functions of the feedwater system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the five main functions of the feedwater system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how pump cavitation during low flow conditions is avoided.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain how the startup feedwater control valve is used during the start of the feedwater system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the point in the feedwater loop at which the feedwater is referred to as boiler water.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall describe the major components of the feedwater system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain at least three pieces of information pertaining to the deaerator typically found on the DCS display.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the function of the boiler feed pumps.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the purpose of maintaining low differential temperatures across the boiler feed pumps through the use of warm – up lines.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe indications relating to equipment status and values of key process variables, when presented with a graphic of the feedwater system display that students can identify.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain why the use of extraction steam to heat feedwater flowing through high pressure heaters improves unit efficiency.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the function of the high level dump valves installed on high pressure feedwater heaters.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall describe the component contols of the feedwater system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain three conditions that must exist (the permissives) before a boiler feed pump can be started.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the process trips that will take the boiler feed pump off – line.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the actions that the operator must complete prior to starting a boiler feed pump during unit startup.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how the flow of feedwater through the feedwater block valve is controlled when the valve is open.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the function of the third point heater drain pump.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the purpose of the high pressure heater vent valves.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall describe the process controls of a feedwater system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the “auto” operation of the startup feedwater valve control during startup or low – load operation.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe a graphic of the boiler feedwater pump discharge flow controller and various indications relating to the status of the boiler feedwater pump.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the function of the feedwater master control.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the term cascading drain arrangement as it pertains to high – pressure feedwater heaters.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall describe operation of the feedwater system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain actions the operator needs to ensure have been completed to prepare the feedwater system for startup.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe a graphic of the boiler feed pump control and feed pump parameters that should be monitored during startup.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the feedwater system parameters that the operator should monitor during normal operation.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe steps required to shutdown the feedwater system.

Lesson 1: Feedwater System Function

  • Functions of the Feedwater System
  • Feedwater System Simplified Flow Path
  • Startup Valve
  • Feedwater Block Valve

Lesson 2: Major Components of the Feedwater System

  • Major Components
  • Deaerator Storage Tank
  • Boiler Feed Pumps
  • High Pressure Heaters

Lesson 3: Component Controls

  • Component Controls
  • Boiler Feed Pump Controls
  • Feedwater Block Valve Controls
  • Third Point Heater Drain Pump Controls
  • High Pressure Heater Vents Controls

Lesson 4: Feedwater System Process Control

  • Feedwater Startup Valve Controls
  • Boiler Feedwater Pump Discharge Flow Controller
  • Feedwater Master
  • HP Heater Level Control

Lesson 5: Feedwater System Operation

  • Startup Prerequisites
  • Feedwater System Startup
  • Normal Operation
  • System Shutdown
3 $85

An important component of the Control Operator Training Program is a thorough understanding of the Condensate System.

During this course, you will be introduced to the Condensate System through a series of lessons describing the inner workings of the Condensate System from system building blocks (individual components) to the full operation of the system.

Always review specific plant startup and operating procedures for proper operation of system and equipment.

3.5 $85

A thorough understanding of the Circulating Water System is an important component of the Control Operator Training Program.

In this course, you will be introduced to the Circulating Water System through a series of lessons discussing the function of the Circulating Water System, its major components, and their component controls.

When you are familiar with the components of the Circulating Water System, you will then learn the process controls behind the operation of the system.

Finally, your understanding of the Circulating Water System will be summarized by a discussion of how the system components and process controls come together during Circulating Water System Operation.

Always review specific plant start – up and operating procedures for proper operation of system and equipment.

Learning Objectives

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain the function of the circulating water system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the circulating water flow path and major components found in it.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain operating status of major components indicated when presented with a typical circulating water DCS graphic.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe criculating water system data.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain role and function of major components associated with the circulating water system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the function of circulating water pumps in the circulating water system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the operation of the condenser in a circulating water system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe which symbol is used on a DCS graphic to indicate a bad quality point, which could relate to either a malfunctioning instrument or an out of range reading.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the function and operation of the cooling tower found in the circulating water system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how fans in the cooling tower can be used to de – ice cooling tower inlet louvers.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain digital component controls.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the startup process for the circulating water pump motors.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain important elements related to the operation of the circulating water pumps such as the start and stop soft keys, when shown a display of the circulating water pump DCS display.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe control of the main cooling tower controls, such as the fan control and the bypass valve control.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain the circulating water system process control.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how the operator uses the makeup control valve to establish and maintain water level in the cooling tower basin.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain key elements of the control used by the operator to establish and monitor the basin water level.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain how to efficiently operate the circulating water system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall list support systems that must be in service prior to the startup of the circulating water system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain four main actions that must be taken by the operator to ensure successful startup of the system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the point in system start when the second circulating water pump is prepared for startup.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain actions required by the outside rounds operator during normal operation.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe steps taken to shut down the circulating water system.

Lesson 1: Circulating Water System Function

  • Circulating Water System Function
  • Flow Path
  • Circulating Water System Flow Path
  • Circulating Water System Data

Lesson 2: Major Components

  • Major Components
  • Circulating Water Pumps
  • Condenser
  • Cooling Tower

Lesson 3: Component Controls

  • Component Controls
  • Circulating Water Pump Controls
  • Cooling Tower Controls

Lesson 4: Process Control

  • Process Control
  • Cooling Tower
  • Auto/Manual Control
  • Basin Level Setpoint

Lesson 5: Circulating Water System Operation

  • Startup Prerequisites
  • System Startup
  • Normal Operation
  • System Shutdown
2 $65

This course provides a general overview of some basic knowledge sets that are essential for a solid understanding of plant control systems.

In this course you will become familiar with typical Distributed Control Systems (DCS) capabilities.

You will also learn how to apply your DCS knowledge to understanding how power plant processes are accessed and controlled using DCS controllers.

Learning Objectives

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain how the distributive control system (DCS) functions.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall recall the three types of data about plant processes that are collected and stored by the DCS.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain four items of plant equipment that can be controlled by a DCS.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how the operator’s control commands are communicated to the appropriate plant device by the DCS.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the various elements of the operator workstation.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain the basics of process controls.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the four functional blocks that comprise a control loop.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the function of five types of digital computer logic blocks used in a power plant DCS.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the two types of control signals used by a DCS controller.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the current range of analog signals used in a control system.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain and interpret control diagrams.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe five of the symbols that are typically used on a Foxboro control diagram.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the types of control symbols commonly found on control diagrams.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe five common signal converters that can be shown on control diagrams.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain three kinds of logic gates used in control diagrams.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain the workstation environment.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the features of the faceplate used for the deaerator level controller, including its associated trend graphic.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the meanings of the five letters used in control blocks found in operator displays that provide additional information about the state of the block.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the types of information presented when shown a typical DCS alarm screen.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the functions of the soft keys that appear along the bottom of the screen when shown a typical group display of operator controls.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain basic unit loading and control.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the meanings of four abbreviations typically found on control block displays.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain which equipment losses will trigger a load monitoring control center runback.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe two operator adjustable set – points typically found on the load management control center display.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the three control modes available on a typical load management control center for operating a turbine – generator.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe what is meant by the boiler – follow mode of operation.

Lesson 1: Distributive Control System

  • Distributive Control System Function
  • Plant Control System Overview
  • Analog Data
  • Digital Data
  • Calculated Values
  • Data Access
  • Display Alarms
  • Allows for Control
  • Historical Data Retrieval
  • Control System Data Flow Path
  • Nodebus
  • Control Processors
  • Workstation
  • Communication
  • Types of Displays
  • P & ID Displays
  • Motor Control Displays
  • Process Control Displays

Lesson 2: Process Control Basics

  • Process Control Basics
  • Control Processor
  • Control Loops
  • Relay Control
  • Modulating Control
  • Control Processor
  • DCS Control
  • Computer Logic Blocks
  • AIN and AOUT Blocks
  • CIN Block
  • Lead Lag (LL) Block
  • PID Block
  • Compounds

Lesson 3: Control Diagrams and Symbols

  • Control Diagrams
  • Control Diagram Symbols
  • Sensing Elements and Symbols
  • Final Control Element
  • Converters
  • Signal Processors
  • Foxboro Control Diagram Symbols
  • Logic Gates and Truth Tables

Lesson 4: Workstation Environment

  • Workstation Environment
  • Historical Trend/Retrieval
  • Operator Controllable Faceplates
  • Control Letters
  • Control Block Values
  • Soft Keys
  • Trend Graphs
  • Alarm Display Screen
  • Alarm Priority
  • Alarm Display
  • Review Questions

Lesson 5: Basic Unit Loading and Control

  • Basic Unit Loading and Control
  • Megawatt Demand Signal
  • Unit Demand Limiter
  • Runbacks
  • LMCC
  • Operator Adjustable Setpoints
  • LMCC Controls
  • Control Modes
  • LMCC Controls
  • Review Questions
4 $85

This course discusses the importance of impedance of a system and the effects of voltage drop. The course begins with a quick review of trigonometric functions and their use in power – system calculations.

2 $65

This course covers the importance of impedance of a system and the effects of voltage drop. The lesson begins with a quick review of trigonometric functions and their use in power system calculations.

2 $65

The first lesson provides a quick review of trigonometric functions and their use in power system calculations. This course then goes on to cover the importance of impedance of a system and the effects of voltage drop.

2 $65

This course introduces the student to the concept of reactive power, including inductance, reactance, and power factor. The lessons also discuss power factor correction and its importance to the power system.

2 $65

This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of alternating current and basic circuit analysis for resistive circuits.

2 $65

This course will present and discuss the factors involved in power plant control, including: 1. Adjustment of active power and reactive power output. 2. Adjustment of the primer mover and auxiliary systems to meet the power output requirement. 3. Types of plant automatic control systems.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to present the factors affecting turbine cycle efficiency to increase the operator’s awareness and effectiveness in controlling heat rate.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to present the actions an operator can take to correct efficiency problems related to the turbine cycle.

2 $65

The objective of this course is to present the factors affecting turbine cycle efficiency to increase operators’ awareness of these matters and improve their effectiveness in controlling heat rate.

1 $32.5

The objective of this course is to discuss how the operator can manipulate the factors affecting boiler efficiency (as discussed in the previous course) in order to achieve the most efficient boiler operation.

1 $32.5

The objective of this course is to present the factors affecting boiler efficiency so as to increase the operator’s awareness and effectiveness. The corrective operator actions are dealt with in the lesson involving HRO – 4.

1 $32.5

The following course is intended to help you to prepare for the NERC Certification Exam. This course will familiarize you with many concepts that you should expect to encounter in the exam.

In this part you will discuss what should happen when islanded. For instance, what does using one or more generators to energize lines and loads after blackout require? How should frequency be set before picking up load? For first load pick – up during black – start, what is required?.

In lesson one, you will review different black – start scenarios and e – Tagging highlights, and discuss how to qualify for an exception (cancellation request). The second lesson consists of control and performance review questions, such as minimum requirements of spinning reserve, how CPSI can be interpreted, and inadvertent interchange accumulations pay back.

The course also offers a variety of review documents, study tools, and practice exam questions to aid you in your preparat.

2 $65

The following course is intended to help you to prepare for the NERC Certification Exam. This course will familiarize you with many concepts that you should expect to encounter in the exam.

The course also offers a variety of review documents, study tools, and practice exam questions to aid you in your preparation efforts.

This course is a tool and to be effective it must be coupled with your study of the NERC Standards and real – time application thereof.

Please review the NERC Glossary of Terms before beginning this module.

4 $85

The following course is intended to help you to prepare for the NERC Certification Exam. This course will familiarize you with many concepts that you should expect to encounter in the exam.

The course also offers a variety of review documents, study tools, and practice exam questions to aid you in your preparation efforts.

This course is a tool and to be effective it must be coupled with your study of the NERC Standards and real – time application thereof.

Please review the NERC Glossary of Terms before beginning this module.

6 $105

This course introduces the concept of Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) and the Reliability Standards developed by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC). Critical Infrastructure Protection is the protection of government – identified assets, both logical and physical, that are essential for the functioning of a society and economy.

This course explores the cybersecurity measures implemented by NERC as part of their mission to ensure the reliability of the bulk power system in North America.

4 $85

This course introduces the student to NERC Standard PER – 005, which is intended to ensure that system operators who perform real – time, reliability – related tasks on the North American Bulk Electric System (BES) are competent to perform their assigned reliability – related tasks. Topics covered include an introduction to what PER – 005 is all about, PER – 005 training topics, a review of certification requirements, the specific requirements of NERC Standard PER – 005, how to comply with PER – 005, measures, and data retention.

1 $32.5

This course provides an introduction and overview of the three key NERC standards: CIP – 004, PER – 005, and TOP – 007. Scenarios in which the user must make decisions that are consistent with NERC requirements are also part of this course.

1 $32.5

2003 U. S. Eastern Area Blackout
I. Getting Started
A. Purpose of This Training
B. Learning Objectives
C. Training Methods and Measurements.

II. The 2003 Blackout
An overview of events
(1) Pre – disturbance
(2) Cascading Events and Timetable
B. Root Causes of the blackout
C. How it Might Have Been Prevented or Limited in Scope

III. Completion Exercise
This course is prepared to provide a summary review of the U.S. Eastern area blackout that occurred on August 14, 2003. The learning objectives are for (a) the training familiarization with the root causes of this cascading occurrence; (B) review of restoration techniques; and (c) building of emergency preparedness skill sets.
The review of any grid disturbance is conducted in order to learn from the event in order to enhance our emergency preparedness. It is important to learn from the past, but also to recognize the great value and daily contribution of our grid operations personnel.

There will be a completion exercise to measure the effectiveness of this training module and to provide a feed – back for your evaluation of the training module.

2 $65

An important component of the Control Operator Training Program is a thorough understanding of heat rate improvement.

During this course, you will be introduced to the heat losses and loss correction/improvement for the following major system components.

  • Boiler
  • Turbine (using heat balance and turbine performance curves)
  • Heat exchangers
  • Cooling tower

This course takes you through a series of lessons discussing the functions of the boiler, turbine, heat exchangers, and cooling tower, as well as their major components and component controls. Once you are familiar with each of these components, your knowledge of the heat rate improvement system will be further developed through a discussion on how the system components and process controls come together to improve heat rate by correcting and improving heat losses.

Learning Objectives

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain boiler losses and how to control them.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe three major factors that can impact the various boiler losses that can occur.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the impact of air heater gas outlet temperatures that exceed the design values.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe causes and results of poor heat transfer in the furnace.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain additional causes of and solutions for controlling boiler losses.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the causes of high exit gas temperature from the convection section of the furnace.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain why more air than is theoretically necessary for complete combustion (i.e., excess air) must be supplied to a real boiler to minimize the amount of unburned carbon in the ash and flue gas.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the two basic causes of incomplete combustion in the furnace.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain additional factors that lead to boiler losses.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe major contributors to air leakage into the furnace.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the impact of larger coal particle size on the operation and efficiency of the boiler.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe boiler losses not typically included in boiler design efficiency that can be controlled through good operating and maintenance practices.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain turbine losses and how to control them.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe two principal reasons for making a heat balance calculation.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain how the time required to gather all of the information required for a heat balance calculation can impact the reliability of the result.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain causes of and solutions for turbine losses.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe typical situations for which correction factor curves can be used to determine approximate heat rates without the need for calculating new heat balances.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the decline in heat rate that occurs as the throttle steam temperature is decreased.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe factors accounted for in the turbine overall performance curve that plots heat rate as a function of generator output.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe three kinds of changes that can occur in the steam path of the turbine that result in reduced turbine efficiency.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain additional factors that lead to turbine losses.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the reasons why it is important, in terms of minimizing turbine degradation and consequent loss of efficiency, to follow the manufacturer’s turbine starting and loading procedure.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain three possible causes of high condenser pressures.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe two main consequences of air leakage into the condenser.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain off – design operations.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe reasons why the operator must take action if either the superheater or reheater steam temperature varies from normal values.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain four causes of off – design reheat steam temperatures.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the impact on net unit heat rate of using reheat attemperation spray flows above design levels.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the impact on net unit heat rate of using lower final feedwater temperatures.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain heat exchanger losses and how to control them.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the consequences of not maintaining the proper water level on the shell – side of the feedwater heaters.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain why it is important to ensure that the deaerator vents are properly set.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe steps the operator can take to control the temperature of the condensate in the condenser to avoid sub – cooling of the condensate.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain conditions that can cause a reduction of circulating water flow in the condenser.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain cooling tower losses and how to control them.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how wet bulb temperature differs from dry bulb temperature.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain what the term dew point temperature means.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how the tower size varies with heat load for a given range, approach, and wet bulb temperature.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain cause of and solutions for cooling tower losses.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how wind flow over the cooling tower can affect its cooling performance.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain why modulating flow rates should not be used to control cooling water temperature.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe three physical limitations of variable speed fans.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain how ice buildup in towers during freezing weather can be controlled by manipulation of airflow through the tower.

Lesson 1A: Understanding and Controlling Boiler Losses

  • Boiler Losses
  • Boiler Controllable Losses
  • Air Heater Performance
  • Air Heater Gas – out Temperature
  • Cold – End Metal Temperature
  • Above – Design Economizer Gas Outlet Temperature
  • Poor Heat Transfer
  • Excess Air
  • Burner Level Selection and Tilts

LESSON 1 B: Understanding and Controlling Boiler Losses (Continued)

  • Boiler Convection Section
  • Excess Air/Oxygen
  • Excess Air
  • Unburned Carbon(Incomplete Combustion)

Lesson 1 C: Understanding and Controlling Boiler Losses (Continued)

  • Leakage
  • Coal Fineness
  • Flame Stability
  • Radiation and Convection Losses
  • Other Losses

Lesson 2 A: Understanding and Controlling Turbine Losses

  • Turbine Losses
  • Heat Balance Diagram
  • Factors Affecting Heat Balance
  • Valve Characteristics Curves
  • Reheat Steam Flow
  • Time

Lesson 2 B: Understanding and Controlling Turbine Losses (Continued)

  • Turbine Losses
  • Turbine Working Curves
  • Turbine Expansion Line End Points
  • Generator Loss Curves
  • Correction Factor Curves
  • Overall Performance Curve
  • Causes of Poor Turbine Efficiency Changes in Steam Path

Lesson 2 C: Understanding and Controlling Turbine Losses (Continued)

  • Turbine Cycle Operator – Controllable Losses
  • Turbine Cycle Losses
  • Controlling Rate of Degradation
  • Controlling Loss During Turbine Startup
  • High Turbine Backpressure (High Condenser Pressure)
  • Air Leakage
  • Identifying the Source of Leakage

Lesson 2 D: Understanding and Controlling Turbine Losses (Continued)

  • Off – Design Operations
  • Off – Design Throttle Steam Pressure
  • Off – Design Throttle Steam Temperature
  • Off – Design Reheat Steam Temperature
  • Causes of Off – Design Reheat Steam Temperature
  • Burner Level Selection and Tilt
  • Off – Design Superheat Attemperation Spray Flow
  • Off – Design Reheat Attemperation Spray Flow
  • Off – Design Feedwater Temperature
  • Subcooling Hotwell Temperature

Lesson 3: Understanding and Controlling Heat Exchanger Losses

  • Understanding and Controlling Heat Exchanger Losses
  • Heat Exchangers
  • Feedwater Heaters
  • Deaerator in Heat Balance
  • Condenser Performance

Lesson 4 A: Understanding and Controlling Cooling Tower Losses

  • Cooling Tower Performance
  • Heat Load, Range, and Approach
  • Determining the State of Humid Air
  • Dry Bulb Temperature
  • Wet Bulb Temperature
  • Dew Point
  • Tower Size and Range
  • Tower Size and Approach
  • Tower Size
  • Effects of Wet Bulb Temperature on Cooling Tower Size

Lesson 4 B: Understanding and Controlling Cooling Tower Losses (Continued)

  • Cooling Tower Performance
  • Recirculation and Interference
  • Water Temperature Control and Energy Management
  • Factors that Influence Tower Performance
  • Basic Fan Laws
  • Physical Limitations
  • Tower Operation in Freezing Weather
  • Air – Side Control
  • Water – Side Control
  • Thermal Gradients
  • Water Distribution

Lesson 5: Air Pollution Control System Operation

  • Startup Prerequisites
  • System Startup
  • Normal Operation
  • System Shutdown Operations
2.5 $85

This course contains information about the Abnormal Plant Conditions System. Within this course, several critical abnormal plant conditions and associated responses are described.

This course addresses the hierarchy of alarms as well as the following topics.

  • How to identify process equipment, Foxboro System Alarms, and alarm status
  • How to interpret and print an alarm list
  • How to respond appropriately to alarms
  • How to respond appropriately to the loss of a condensate pump
  • How to respond appropriately to the loss of a feed – water pump
  • How to respond appropriately to the loss of a fan pair
  • How to respond appropriately to high vibration in turbines
  • How to respond appropriately to turbine thermal stress limiting (+)
  • How to respond appropriately to turbine thermal stress limiting ( – )

Learning Objectives

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain equipment alarms.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe types of information that can be shown in an alarm display.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the nature of a priority 1 alarm.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain Foxboro alarm systems.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the color codes used to indicate different levels of system alarms.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain how color codes are used to indicate the operating status of hardware devices shown on Foxboro control displays.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the field operator’s responsibilities as they pertain to locally resetting failed devices.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain how to respond to an alarm.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the types of information available to the control room operator on a typical alarm response card that provides a reference to ensure a proper response to an equipment trip or failure.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the tripped equipment on a graphic of a Foxboro control screen.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain a boiler feed pump trip.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the actions taken by the DCS when in auto mode in response to a trip of a boiler feed pump.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the actions that should be taken by the control room operator after the cause of the feed pump trip has been determined and corrected.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain a fan pair trip and the appropriate response to it.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the first indication the control room operator has that an ID fan trip has occurred.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain how the unit responds to an ID fan trip and the associated DCS automated responses.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe what actions the control room operator takes after an ID fan trip when the unit is stable.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain a turbine high vibration alarm.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the control room operator’s responses to a turbine bearing high vibration condition alarm.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain symptoms the field operator might see after a high bearing vibration alarm that could indicate a problem with the lube oil supply to the turbine bearings.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain turbine thermal stress limiting condition in the negative direction.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the reason for a thermal stress limit alarm during a cold start of the turbine.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain an action the control room operator can take in response to a stress limit alarm to reduce the amount of differential expansion of the turbine during a cold start.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe two actions the control room operator can take in response to a thermal stress limit alarm to reduce the heat (i.e., enthalpy) of the steam entering the turbine during a cold start.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain turbine thermal stress limiting condition in the negative direction.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the function of startup probes installed on a steam turbine system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain two actions the control room operator can take in response to a thermal stress limit alarm to increase the temperature of steam entering the turbine during a hot restart.

Lesson 1: Equipment Alarms

  • Equipment Alarm Display

Lesson 2: Foxboro System Alarms

  • Foxboro System Alarms
  • System Alarms
  • Hardware Device Colors
  • Inhibited Alarms
  • Network Display
  • Equipment Information
  • Acknowledging System Alarms
  • Review
  • Field Operator Responsibilities

Lesson 3: Alarm Response

  • Alarm Response
  • Alarms
  • Condensate Pump Trip
  • DCS Alarm and DCS Automated Response Occurs

Lesson 4: Boiler Feed Pump Trip

  • Boiler Feed Pump Trip
  • DCS Alarm and DCS Automated Response

Lesson 5: Fan – Pair Trip (ID and FD)

  • Induced Draft Fan Trip
  • DCS Alarm and DCS Automated Response

Lesson 6: Turbine High Vibration

  • High Vibration in Turbine Bearing No. 3
  • DCS Alarm and DCS Automated Response
  • Alarm Set – Point

Lesson 7: Turbine Thermal Stress Limiting (+)

  • Turbine Thermal Stress Limiting (+)
  • DCS Alarm and DCS Automated Response
  • Alarm Set – Point and Unit Response

Lesson 8: Turbine Thermal Stress Limiting ( – )

  • Turbine Thermal Stress Limiting ( – )
  • DCS Alarm and DCS Automated Response
  • Alarm Set – Point and Unit Response
1.5 $65

This course of the Control Room Operator Training Program describes efficient, reliable, and environmentally sensitive operations.

This course contains information on the following topics:
.

  • Basic Efficiency Principles
  • Boiler Efficiency
  • Turbine Efficiency
  • Condenser Efficiency
  • Feedwater Heaters
  • Auxiliary Power Consumption
  • Environmentally Sensitive Operations

Learning Objectives

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain basic efficiency principles.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe what is meant by terms gross and net heat rate.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain what is meant by net unit efficiency.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain boiler efficiency.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the purpose of the steam generator in power plant operation.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain which type of steam generator is most commonly used in the power industry.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the process of natural circulation in a boiler.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain three ways that combustion side heat transfer occurs in the boiler.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how the use of FD and ID fans impact the efficiency of the boiler.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how the use of heat exchanger type air heaters to preheat incoming air can improve the efficiency of the boiler.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain how changes in fuel quality can affect the boiler efficiency.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain turbine efficiency.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the basic principle of operation of a steam turbine generator.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain where operators can find enthalpies for water in its various states that can be used in calculating plant and component efficiencies.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe why large steam turbines are divided into several sections.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the function of the turbine nozzles.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the purpose of the thrust bearing located on the turbine rotor assembly.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe valve arrangements that control the admission of steam to the HP turbine from the boiler.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain condenser efficiency.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the function of a properly designed condenser.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain four factors that impact condenser performance.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the two main methods for physically supporting the condenser.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the functions of the condenser hotwell.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the equipment that can be used to remove air and other non – condensable gases from the condenser.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the function of the vacuum breakers located on the condenser shell.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain feedwater heaters.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the advantages of using extraction steam and feedwater heaters to preheat feedwater before it enters the economizer.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the type of heat transferred from the extraction steam used in the feedwater heater.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the construction arrangement of a typical closed feedwater heater.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain why removal of dissolved gases from the boiler feedwater by the deaerator is important.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe three methods that can be used to mix water and steam in the deaerator.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain auxiliary power consumption.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how unit loading affects auxiliary power consumption.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain how the time of the year affects auxiliary power consumption.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how operating conditions affect auxiliary power consumption.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain environmental operations.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe air pollutants that can be formed when incomplete combustion conditions exist in the boiler.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain how SOX created during the combustion process can be removed from the flue gas.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe fuel – dependent pollutants.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain combustion – dependent pollutants.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how to control emissions.

Lesson 1: Basic Efficiency Principles

  • Heat Rate (Gross and Net)
  • Steam Unit Efficiency

Lesson 2: Boiler Efficiency

  • Boiler Efficiency
  • Steam Generator Theory
  • Steam Generator Construction
  • Boiler Tube Heat Transfer
  • Combustion Side Heat Transfer
  • Combustion Air and Flue Gas
  • Air Heaters
  • Fuel Quality

Lesson 3: Turbine Efficiency

  • Turbine Efficiency
  • Specific Volume
  • Enthalpy
  • Turbine Construction and Flow
  • Expansion of Steam Flow through Nozzles
  • Turbine Sections

Lesson 4: Condenser Efficiency

  • Condenser Efficiency
  • Condenser Theory
  • Log Mean Temperature Differential
  • Condenser Performance Curves
  • Factors Impacting Condenser Performance
  • Condenser Support Systems
  • Condenser Data
  • Condenser Support
  • Condenser
  • Internal Arrangement
  • Condenser Hotwell
  • Air Removal Equipment
  • Vacuum Breakers
  • Condenser Cooling Water

Lesson 5: Feedwater Heaters

  • Feedwater Heaters
  • Closed Feedwater Heater Theory
  • Closed Feedwater Heater Construction
  • Open Heater (Deaerator) Theory
  • Deaerator Construction

Lesson 6: Auxiliary Power Consumption

  • Introduction
  • Auxiliary Power
  • Auxiliary Power Consumption

Lesson 7: Environmentally Sensitive Operations

  • Introduction
  • Fuel – dependent Pollutants
  • Combustion – dependent Pollutants
  • Opacity (Particulates)
  • Controlling Emissions
3 $85

This course contains information pertaining to unit – integrated start – up and shutdown. A typical boiler, turbine, and generator system are used as the models for this course.

Topics covered include the following.

  • Pre – start checklist and precautions, limitations, and setpoints
  • Performing complete unit start – up
  • Troubleshooting unit – integrated operation systems and components during normal operation
  • Pre – shutdown checklist
  • Performing complete unit shutdown
  • Performing unit system valve line – ups

Important: Always review specific plant start – up and operating procedures for proper operation of systems and equipment.

Learning Objectives

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain integrated unit startup procedure.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the purpose of the integrated unit startup procedure.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee, when presented with a display graphic for the load monitoring control center, shall identify the section of the display in which mode of control being used for the turbine is indicated.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the boiler follow mode of control for the turbine – generator unit.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain precautions that should be observed before a unit startup.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe systems that should be in service before a unit startup is initiated.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain a unit cold startup.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall state the approximate temperature at which the circulating water supply should be maintained.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain why chemicals are added to the condensate system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe actions to be taken by the plant operator in preparation for the startup of the feedwater system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain boiler feed pump parameters that should be monitored during startup.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how the amount of time the turbine should be on turning gear operation prior to startup is related to the length of time the turbine generator has been out of service.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the steps involved in starting primary and secondary air heater motors.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee, when shown a graphic display of the furnace pressure master control, shall identify the furnace pressure master setpoint.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall state the pressure that should be attained in the steam drum before the plant operator is asked to close the drum vents.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the parameters that should be monitored during turbine run – up.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee, when shown a control graphic screen for a pulverizer, shall identify the permissives that need to be met before the pulverizer can be started.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe typical equipment operating parameters that should be monitored during normal operation of turbine – generator unit.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain normal operation and shutdown.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee, when presented with a control graphic for the condensate system, shall identify parameters that should be monitored during normal operation.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee, when shown a graphic of the superheat spray valve control block, shall identify the superheat temperature trend graph.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe typical operator actions required regarding the air pollution control system during normal operations.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain why support fuel is placed in service during unit shutdown.

Lesson 1: Unit – Integrated Start – up

  • Boiler, Turbine, and Generator System
  • Precautions, Limitations, and Setpoints
  • Pre – start Checklist (Start – up Prerequisites)

Lesson 2: Cold Start – up

  • Start Up the Circulating Water System
  • Prepare for Starting the Condensate System
  • Prepare for Feedwater System Start – up
  • Prepare to Start the Air Preheaters
  • Start – up-Purge Permissives
  • Scrubber Atomizer Start
  • Boiler Water and Steam System Drains

Lesson 3: Normal Operation and Shutdown

  • Circulating Water System
  • Condensate System
  • Feedwater System
  • Air Pollution Control System
  • System Shutdown
3.5 $85

This course covers the functions and controls associated with the generator and auxiliaries system, which is an important factor in your total comprehension of the Control Operator Training Program. This course will guide you through the basics of the generator and auxiliaries system, the various components, their functions as a part of the whole system, and the controls associated with them. Also, your comprehension of these components will be occasionally tested, with a comprehensive final at the end of the course.

Important: Always review specific plant start – up and operating procedures for proper operation of systems and equipment.

Learning Objectives

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain the generator and auxiliaries system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the function of the generator excitation system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain functions of the generator seal oil system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe why carbon dioxide is used for purging air or hydrogen from the generator casing.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain major features of the stator cooling water flow path.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain the generator and the excitor system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe basic principles of operation of a generator such as would be found on the power system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain how the turbine speed changes when the generator power output increases without a corresponding increase in electrical demand from the power system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the function of the generator excitation system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the only process variable that can affect the MW output of the generator.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the purpose of the under – excitation limiter.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe why hydrogen is used to cool the generator internals.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the possible consequence of high stator winding temperatures.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain component controls of the generator and auxiliaries system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the startup process for the hydrogen cooling water system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee, when shown a control screen graphic for the drive group seal oil, shall identify indications for the standby and emergency pump auto start conditions.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee, when presented with a control screen graphic for the drive group stator cooling water control, shall identify the auto start permit.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee, when shown the control screen graphic for stator cooling water pumps, shall identify which pump is running and which is stopped.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain process controls for the generator and auxiliaries system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the function of the generator voltage regulator.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee, when shown the control graphic for the automatic voltage regulator, shall identify AVR status and alarm indications.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how changes in the exciter field strength affect the generator output voltage.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain operation of the generator and auxiliaries system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe support systems that must be in service prior to starting the generator and auxiliaries system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain stator cooling water parameters that should be monitored during normal operation of the generator and auxiliaries system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how the generator voltage/MVAR load is adjusted during normal operation to meet dispatch requirements.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the procedure for normal shutdown of the turbine generator.

Lesson 1: Generator and Auxiliaries System

  • Generator and Auxiliaries Systems
  • Simplified Flow – path Generator and Excitation System
  • Hydrogen Cooling System Flow – path
  • Hydrogen Cooling Water
  • Generator Seal Oil System Flow – path
  • Stator Cooling Water System Flow – path

Lesson 2: Generator and Exciter System

  • Generator and Exciter System
  • Hydrogen Cooling System
  • Generator Seal Oil System
  • Stator Cooling Water System

Lesson 3: Component Controls

  • Drive Group Hydrogen Cooling Water Pump Controls
  • Drive Group Seal Oil Controls
  • Drive Group Stator Cooling Water Controls

Lesson 4: Generator and Auxiliaries System Process Control

  • Generator Excitation Controls

Lesson 5: Generator and Auxiliaries System Operation

    • Start – up Prerequisites
    • System Start – up
    • Normal Operation
    • System Shutdown
3.5 $85

This last portion of the course reviews IRO Standards, NERC PRC and CIP Standards, protecting cyber assets and cyber security. Security monitoring and NERC compliance relate to operations and annual emergency preparedness training should include these contingencies as well.

5 $105

Good communication keeps the power rolling. Whether it’s a smoother migration or a restoration effort, listen to what others are saying and share the information. Know also the length of the Performance – Reset Period.

This part covers e – tagging as well as INT standards and Emergency Operations. Remember well: preparedness in an emergency situation is not the responsibility of just one person but of all concerned. Everyone plays a part.

5 $105

Knowledge of the NERC standards and the application of these standards in the workplace are important for maintaining reliability and good operating practices. This course is designed to provide you with a practical understanding of each NERC operating standard.

“Face time” is the time spent reading and studying the standards. At the end of the course, you will complete an exercise that will test how well you understand the NERC Standards and how to apply each standard.

4 $85

This course provides a general overview of some very important basic knowledge sets necessary for a solid understanding of plant control systems.

This course contains information pertaining to the Turbine and Auxiliaries System. A typical Turbine and Auxiliaries System and its associated controls are described within this course.

Always review specific plant startup and operating procedures for proper operation of systems and equipment.

Learning Objectives

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain how the turbine and auxiliaries system functions.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the purpose of the turbine in a turbine – generator set.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the functions of the turbine lube oil system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the gland steam seal system of the turbine.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the steam flow path of a typical main turbine.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain types of information that can be found on the turbine valve position graphic display.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the main features of the lube oil system flow path.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the major features of the electro – hydraulic control system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the three sources of steam for the gland steam sealing system.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain the major components of the turbine and auxiliaries system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe two types of bearings that are used for the support and alignment of the turbine rotor shaft.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee, when shown a control graphic for the turbine bearings, shall identify the differential and absolute expansion indications for the HP and IP turbines.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the functioning of low pressure turbine relief diaphragms.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the purpose of the vacuum breakers located on the neck of the condenser.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the major components of the turbine lube oil system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the purpose of the electro – hydraulic control system.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain components that comprise the gland steam system.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain component controls of the turbine and auxiliaries system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the operation of the 125VDC emergency lube oil pump.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee, when shown a graphic of the unit lube oil control, shall identify the control blocks for the drive group lube oil, auxiliary lube oil pump and the emergency lube oil pump.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the lube oil system startup process.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee, when shown a graphic of the air removal equipment screen, shall identify the condenser vacuum pump control.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the particular condenser vacuum pump used during startup.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how the auxiliary gland steam controls that allow auxiliary steam rather than turbine valve leakoff steam to be used to seal the turbine.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain at which point during the startup of the turbine – generator the main and reheat steam line drains are closed.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the function of the automatic turbine startup menus in the DCS displays.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain process controls for the turbine and auxiliaries system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe the operation of the lube oil temperature controller.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain how the EHC controller acts to maintain the temperature of the hydraulic fluid at its setpoint.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe how the gland steam pressure control works to maintain the gland steam pressure at its set – point.

Terminal Objective: The trainee shall explain operation of the turbine and auxiliaries system.

  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe prerequisites that must be met during the startup of a turbine and its auxiliaries.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain the turbine operating parameters that should be monitored during normal operation.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall describe steps that should be taken to shutdown the turbine normally.
  • Enabling Objective: The trainee shall explain how long the turbine should be kept on turning gear after shutdown of the unit.

Lesson 1: Turbine and Auxiliaries System Function

  • Turbine and Auxiliaries System
  • Simplified Flowpath Turbine System
  • Turbine Valve Position Graphic
  • Turbine Lube Oil System Flowpath
  • Gland Steam Sealing System

Lesson 2: Major Components of the Turbine and Auxiliary System

  • Major Components of the Turbine and Auxiliary System Main Turbine System
  • Turbine Lube Oil System
  • EHC System
  • Gland Steam Sealing System

Lesson 3: Components Controls

  • Drive – Group Lube Oil Controls
  • Drive – Group Turning Gear Controls
  • Drive – Group Vacuum Breaker Controls
  • Condenser Vacuum Pump and Associated Controls
  • Drive – Group Gland Steam and Auxiliary Gland Steam Controls Drive – Group Startup Drains Controls
  • Drive – Group Hydraulic Fluid Pumps Controls
  • Automatic Turbine Start – up

Lesson 4: Turbine and Auxiliaries System Process Control

  • Turbine and Auxiliaries System Process Control
  • Lube Oil Temperature Control
  • EHC Oil Temperature Control
  • Gland Steam Pressure Control
  • Gland Steam Temperature Control

Lesson 5: Turbine and Auxiliaries System Operation

  • Turbine and Auxiliaries System Operation
  • Startup Prerequisites
  • System Startup
  • Normal Operation
  • System Shutdown
4.5 $105

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