Special discounts are available for groups, corporate accounts and students taking multiple courses. To learn more, call us toll-free at: 1-877-211-4523

Georgia Real Estate CE

Please note, beginning July 1, 2015, 36 hours of Continuing Education will be required by the Georgia Real Estate Commission. Effective July 1, 2016, 3 of your 36 hours must be a course on Georgia License Law.

Complete your Georgia real estate continuing education requirements. Our courses are designed to help you fulfill your CE credits for your Georgia real estate license renewal. 360training.com is an online real estate school that offers you the convenience of studying at your own pace in any location with Internet connection.

Please check the box next to the course(s) you wish to take. Then click the "Add To Cart" button to proceed with registration.

Course Title Hours Price

Course Description

The objective of this course is to answer this: How must the real estate profession change to make itself relevant to what will prove to be a radically more challenging future? This course will explore in detail the workings of human ecosystems, what it takes to achieve long – term sustainability and well – being, how we are falling short, and the role of an ethical, environmentally responsible real estate professional in helping turn things around.

Content Outline:

  • Structure and Function of Human Ecosystems: Part I
  • Structure and Function of Human Ecosystems: Part II
  • Strategies for Sustainability: Part I
  • Strategies for Sustainability: Part II
  • Sustainability: Part I
  • Sustainability: Part II
  • Professional Ethics for a Sustainable World: Part I
  • Professional Ethics for a Sustainable World: Part II

Learning Objectives

  • Explain the rationale for a human ecology curriculum; Describe how the real estate profession will need to change to make itself relevant to what will prove to be a radically more challenging future; Summarize the scientific perspective on human ecosystems
  • Explain the concept of productivity in human ecosystems; Identify the motivation for productive behavior; Discuss the ecological order; Summarize the economic order; Describe social productivity
  • Discuss the importance of sustainability strategies; Explain the community strategy; Summarize the role of mitigating conflicts in sustainability; Define sociality, empathy, altruism; Discuss the importance of stability and predictability; List the real estate classifications
  • Summarize the importance of experimentation and adaptation; Identify the role of leadership in sustainability; Discuss productive investment; Define resource efficiencies; Recall effective long – term human ecosystem monitoring data
  • Define sustainability and equity; Describe how to assess unsustainability by looking at the global food supply and climate change
  • Discuss the effects of climate change; Identify the problems regarding the global energy and water supply; Define stewardship
  • Describe the historical concept of a professional; Explain why real estate agents should learn about sustainability; Discuss the importance of professional ethics; Summarize real estate history
  • Discuss the history and future of real estate; Describe the interaction between ethics, sustainability, and the real estate profession
4 $40

State Approval Number: 53582

This course is designed to increase your knowledge about expanding environmental issues and laws that have an impact on environmental problems. This course Identifies the procedures used to locate toxic waste sites, the responsibilities for clean up and steps that may be taken to minimize future liabilities.

While real estate agents are not expected to be environmental experts, the same disclosure rules apply as to other facts about a property. That is, if environmental information is known to the sales agent and it would affect a prudent purchaser’s decision to buy, it must be disclosed. Because of this, licensees should be familiar with the nature of these problems as well as the laws and regulations that are intended to protect both the consumer and the environment.

4 $30

Course Description

Identifying environmental hazards and how they affect the real estate industry is the basic goal of this course, including environmental factors that may require a disclosure statement. Other topics covered are air quality, radon, asbestos, urea formaldehyde foam insulation, mold, ground water, smart growth, and green housing. Students will learn about the major health effects and remedies of these substances, as well as ways of preventing or eliminating biological pollutants.

Content Outline:

Environmental Hazards: Indoor Pollutants and Formaldehyde
Asbestos and Lead
Mold
Radon, Ground Water, and Underground Storage Tanks
Hazardous Waste and Brownfields
Wetlands
Smart Growth: Part I
Smart Growth: Part II
Green Housing: Part I
Green Housing: Part II

Learning Objectives

  • List common environmental hazards that require disclosure in a listing agreement; Summarize ways real estate licensees can minimize liability and still fulfill their duties to clients; Discuss sources of pollution that affect indoor air quality; Explain why urea – formaldehyde foam insulation (UFFI) may be a problem to certain people; Identify the major health hazards of formaldehyde
  • Identify the major health effects of exposure to lead and asbestos; Recognize the types of materials that contain asbestos; List sources of lead poisoning; Illustrate what must be disclosed to buyers/sellers when lead contamination is suspected
  • Explain what mold is, the conditions under which it grows, the steps to its prevention, and how to get rid of it; Analyze the health effects of mold exposure; Diagram the steps licensees can take to reduce toxic mold liability; Plan for what real estate professionals can do when microbial contamination is suspected on a property; Summarize the provisions of the proposed Federal Toxic Mold Bill H.R. 5040, otherwise known as the Melina Bill
  • Identify the major health effects of exposure to radon; Name the various ways to test for radon and know what questions to ask when radon pollution is suspected in a home; Recognize sources of groundwater contamination; List clues real estate licensees can look for when inspecting properties for possible underground storage tanks; Follow the testing methods for leaking underground storage tanks
  • Recognize signs of a hazardous waste dump site; Discuss brownfields and why their cleanup and redevelopment is important; Cite the legislation which governs brownfields and explain the intent of the legislation; Identify who is liable for the cleanup costs of a brownfield, who is responsible for the revitalization, and who is exempt from the restoration laws
  • Illustrate the functions of wetlands and the importance of wetland remediation; Classify the unique characteristics of different wetland types, specifically marshes, swamps and bogs; Evaluate the various landowner assistance programs available to wetland owners; Relate the position held by NAR in regards to wetland legislation; Identify the entities who regulate the management and use of wetlands
  • Discuss courses of action a buyer could take when an environmental hazard is found on a property; Describe and explain the responsibilities a licensee has to a client when conducting a real estate transaction, such as disclosure of noted potential environmental hazards; Delineate the kinds of projects for which loans are offered by the Clean Water State Revolving Fund program; Elaborate on what smart growth is and why it is important; Recite the key points of the relationship between smart growth and both environmental protection and business
  • Analyze the costs of sprawl and the results of poorly managed growth; Enumerate the key features of smart growth that simultaneously protect environmental assets, build community livability, and encourage economic development; Evaluate the real estate professional’s role in promoting smart growth and becoming an advocate for increased quality of life
  • Elaborate on buyer demand for healthy homes, how to sell them and cost comparisons of green homes versus traditional ones; List the four main causes of poor indoor air quality; Summarize the potential dangers of modern materials used in construction
  • Relate the components of energy efficient houses and list some of the green features in newly built homes; Recognize that real estate professionals should be able to help clients make the best decision about buying a home which will cost less in terms of energy use; Distinguish how building green healthy homes can increase the buying power for a homebuyer and increase selling power, as well, by making older homes more appealing; Measure energy ratings and energy efficient mortgages

10 lesson assessments
1 post assessment.

6 $60

Course Description

This course is one in a series of Human Ecology courses. Thousands of times every day, real estate licensees influence the choices people make about the homes, neighborhoods, and the communities in which they live. Licensees who take particular care to acknowledge when homes are efficient and well – built, the neighborhoods livable, and the communities sustainable, are helping make such desirable properties more available and more valuable. Topics covered include the concept of energy and humanity’s reliance on it, the use of energy in different sectors, global warming; global oil depletion, approaches to a more sustainable future, and how the real estate profession can address the challenges of a future with substantially more costly energy.

Content Outline:

  • Energy Concepts
  • The Use of Energy
  • Global Warming
  • Energy Supplies and Their Effects
  • Energy Sources and Solutions to the Energy Crisis
  • Sustainable Lifestyles: Energy and the Real Estate Professional

Learning Objectives

  • Apply the concept of energy; Demonstrate the concept of energy; List the principal resources; Interpret the evolution of human energy reliance
  • Analyze the current use of energy in the U.S in the industrial, transportation, residential and commercial sectors; Describe the fuels used; Summarize the technological advances for conservation
  • Predict the challenges of global warming; Estimate the nature and sources of greenhouse gases; Interpret the Kyoto Protocol; Discuss the problems global warming is causing and likely to cause in a variety of settings in the world
  • Evaluate the nature and effects of global oil depletion; Explain the Hubbert Curve; Describe the possibilities for future energy supplies; Summarize the ideological standoff between supporters of growth versus conservation as it relates to any further reliance on coal and nuclear power
  • Describe some of the dire predictions of running out of cheap energy; Discuss the nature of Earth’s biosphere as a complex, hierarchic, adaptive, self – organizing system; Explain the threat of a major phase transition; Evaluate the promise of New Urbanism as one approach to addressing the transition to a new energy regime in more urban setting
  • Demonstrate some of the more prominent approaches to future sustainable lifestyles in the current suburbs; Discuss kibbutzim, permaculture and intentional communities including co – housing and eco – villages; Discuss the role of the real estate profession in addressing the challenges for a future of substantially more costly energy
3 $30

Course Description

Clear, mutually – acceptable agreements are an essential component of the legal transference of ownership. In the practice of real estate, contracts are the instruments used to describe and record the agreements surrounding the conveyance of property. Some type of contract is nearly always involved, whether a salesperson is promising to sell a property within a specified period of time, a prospective buyer is placing an offer on a house or a seller is considering an offer on property.

Before entering into a legally binding agreement, real estate professionals must fully understand the contracts that govern their industry. Failure to understand contracts opens a licensee to various kinds of liability and can seriously damage one’s professional reputation. Therefore, it is vital that real estate professionals learn this material so that they can protect themselves against errors, oversights and misunderstandings.

In this module, the student will learn about the types of general contracts as well as the different kinds of real estate contracts. The module begins by providing the student with an overview of the various types of contracts: bilateral, unilateral, implied, express, executed, executory, valid, void, voidable and unenforceable. Once the student is introduced to the different types of contracts, he or she learns what makes a contract legally enforceable, this being the five components that make a contract valid: mutual assent, legally competent parties, consideration, lawful objective and adherence to a statute of frauds.

This module includes the following lessons.

  • Introduction to Contracts
  • Contract Fulfillment
  • Real Estate Contracts
  • Contracts, Purchase and Sales Agreements

The fourth and concluding lesson in this module presents real – world dilemmas and concrete applications of the information presented in the rest of the course. As the student completes this module, he or she should try to develop a broad picture of environmental issues and how they fit into the larger practice of real estate; the last lesson will help with this project by presenting comprehensive content questions, practice problems and case studies.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Upon completion of this module, the student will be able to.

  • Name and explain the various components of a valid contract.
  • Identify the differences between a unilateral and bilateral contracts.
  • Describe the various types of contracts.
  • Recognize the difference between a forbearance and performance agreement.
  • Outline the features of a contract (and the contracting parties) that make a contract legally binding.
  • Recognize the general features of an incomplete or incorrectly completed contract.
  • Identify when a contract can be discharged.
  • Recognize the different kinds of real estate contracts.

Regulatory Requirement

Our staff works diligently to provide you with an analysis of current mandates and legislation that affects you the licensee. All information pertaining to the Mandatory Continuing Education requirements can be found on the State Requirements page. You can find the link to this page on the upper Navigation bar on the Course Catalog.

Course Completion

Affidavits can be found by clicking the Help link in the navigation bar on the Course Catalog. The affidavit will also be available to print upon course completion.

Testing

Quizzes – There is a quiz at the end of each lesson to test comprehension of the subject matter.

Final Exam – Passing Grade 70%. You can take the final three times.

About The Subject Matter Expert

Course designed, written and maintained by 360Training. Course material questions can be directed to our Instructor of Record at Instructor.RE@360Training.com. Instructional support questions are returned within 24 business hours with answers provided by a qualified professional in your field through our network of subject matter experts.

Support

If you have any requests for technical support please contact the 360Training Support Department located in the HELP section of your account profile. Technical support inquiries are handled immediately.

4 $40

Course Description

The basics of contracts and contract law and how contracts are used in the real estate industry are addressed in this course. Students will learn the differences between express and implied contracts and bilateral and unilateral contracts as well as how to classify a contract as being executed or executory; the legal effects of a contract; the elements necessary for a valid contract; how a contract can be discharged or terminated and the various other contracts used in real estate.

Content Outline:

Basic Contract Law: Forms, Disclosures, Agency, Title Insurance
Contract Writing: Types of Contracts
Contract Writing: Fraud and Misrepresentation
Contract Writing: Termination of Contracts
Contract Writing and Sales

Learning Objectives

  • Define the term “contract”; Describe the elements which a valid contract must include; Discuss standardized forms most commonly used in real estate; Describe the need for clarity of parties’ intention in contracts; Identify common changes to contracts; Explain fiduciary duty and breach of contract; Indicate the common “buzz words” which deserve special attention
  • Describe oral, implied, and written contracts; Define ambiguous contracts and how they are handled by courts; Discuss equitable title, consideration, legal capacity, offers, and counteroffers
  • Define reality of consent and legality of object; Identify fraud and misrepresentation; Evaluate mistakes of fact and law, undue influence and duress; Classify void, voidable, and executory contracts
  • Describe bilateral and unilateral contracts; Define executory contracts and their discharge and termination; Explain accord, satisfaction, novation, rescission, specific performance, and liquidated damages
  • Define terms and conditions of offers to purchase; Describe earnest money; Explain land contracts; Define mortgages; Describe due on sale; Discuss options and the right of first refusal

5 lesson assessments
1 post assessment.

3 $30

Course Description

Despite limited resources and the potential for violent conflict, nature evolved powerful strategies that resulted in a progression of increasingly complex and productive communities. Those principles, applied to the real estate industry, mandate a system of ethics that results in greater and more sustained professional productivity and significantly improves quality of life in our work environment, homes and communities. This course is designed to inform practicing and prospective real estate professionals about the tested and proven ethical strategies, applied to the real estate professional community, that make communities increasingly industrious and fruitful. This course also helps students understand “productivity” in a human community, as well as the principle to advance and sustain such productiveness. These strategies lead to a system of ethical principles that will improve the quality and prolificacy of one’s professional practice and personal life.

Content Outline:

  • Basic Concepts of Community Ethics
  • Ethical Strategies for Promoting Community Productivity
  • Applying the Strategies to Promote Productivity
  • Review

Learning Objectives

  • Discuss the tested and proven ethical strategies that make communities of any kind increasingly productive; Explain how ethical principles apply to the real estate professional community; Define “productivity” in a human community; Indicate how to improve the productivity of professional practices and the quality of the professional and personal lives of real estate professionals
  • Discuss the basic strategies for promoting productivity in both natural and human communities; Recall motivation to be productive; Explain the challenges of conflict mitigation; Summarize the concepts of differentiation, specialization, and cooperation; Describe how these strategies translate to ethical practice in the real estate professional community
  • Discuss how productivity promotion strategies are applied; Summarize the different ways people cooperate; Explain productive orders, systems, and investments; Recognize the importance of the conservation of resources
  • Summarize the basic strategies to promote productivity such as game theory and cooperation; Discuss the ethical principles of community productivity; Recognize the importance of stability, predictability and experimentation, and the need for a balance between these elements in achieving maximum community productivity; Explain the need for change and adaptation; Identify how experimentation leads to innovation; Differentiate between uniformity and diversity
3 $30

This course provides a basic understanding of ethics and a clear idea of the requirements imposed by the NAR ã?â® Code of Ethics, the student will then explore the steps of the ethical decision – making process and the ways in which ethical conduct contributes to better business practices. (6 hours).

6 $50

Course Description

This course teaches the student how and why we communicate. Learning these basics will provide the student the basis for effective client communication. Knowing what the client wants and being able to find the perfect property based on good communication skills will result in more sales and satisfied clients.

Content Outline:

Effective Communication Models
Pacing and Matching for Effective Communication
Understanding How the Other Person Thinks
Negotiating with Style
Achieving Desired Outcomes in Communication
Understanding and Using Effective Communication.

Learning Objectives

  • Define communication and its meaning; Differentiate between verbal communication and non – verbal communication; Explain and interpret the concept of “the map is not the territory”;
  • Compose an effective communication model
  • Recognize the use and effects of communication when implementing pacing, matching body language, pacing the breath, voice matching, mismatching, and appreciation; Start applying these uses and effects of communication
  • Discover how your client thinks; Recognize the three primary representational systems; Spot accessing cues; Practice “active listening”;
  • Apply this information in guiding negotiations
  • Apply leading and pacing techniques to guide negotiations; Choose predicates to influence participants in a negotiation; Utilize future pacing to get a client to imagine a desired outcome;
  • Set and fire an anchor; Employ directive speaking, presuppositions, influential language and patterns for negotiations
  • Evaluate customers’ criteria, then list and discuss them; Explain the effectiveness of the language of benefits over features; Distinguish customers’ buying behavior; Model how to achieve desired outcomes, in a transaction, a career and a life
  • Evaluate the importance of congruency and incongruency; Recognize the reasons behind using personal criteria; Apply reframing in any situation; Differentiate between being proactive and reactive; Practice conflict resolution; Apply triple descriptions; Follow the principles for negotiation and utilize its techniques

6 lesson assessments
1 post assessment.

3 $30

Course Description

Everything a licensee always wanted to know about buyers and the things the licensee never thought to ask will be found in this course. The student will be taught how to communicate with buyers for almost any situation and objection. This dialog will show the student how to get information from the buyer to assist the buyer in making the choices that are right for them. First impressions about buyers and the buyer’s first impressions of licensees are discussed. Creating a Wish List will help the buyer identify the choices that are important in choosing a home. The student will also be able to construct a Buyer’s Package that is made for each individual buyer from the tips learned in this course. How to handle agency objections and differentiating between customer and client are outlined. This course will take the guess work out of writing offers and closing deals. Once the deal is done the course shows the licensee how to develop a follow up system, keep in touch with buyers and create buyers for life with the referrals a happy buyer will bring.

Content Outline:

  • Preparing For Objections: Part 1
  • Preparing For Objections: Part 2
  • Preparing for Objections: Part 3
  • Buyer’s First Encounter
  • Buyer’s First Meeting
  • The Buyer’s Package
  • Agreements and Agency Objections
  • Showing the Home
  • What Really Works For the Buyer
  • Writing the Offer
  • The Closing
  • Buyers for Life

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the benefits of effective listening to both the buyer and agent;
  • Demonstrate how to respond proactively to buyers’ concerns; Construct buyers’ objections into questions and demonstrate how to address them
  • Demonstrate how to effectively exclude concerns to reach the buyer’s goal; Apply the necessary steps to answer an objection to achieve the end result; Compose an answer being proactive, not reactive
  • Demonstrate an effective tie – down close;
  • Analyze how to get a commitment from a customer/client; Identify ways to ask for business
  • Recognize that attitude is a choice and how that choice affects sales; Demonstrate good body language and why it is important; Develop good rapport with buyers; Discern the buyer’s personality for better communication; Compose words that build value; Interpret when an agent should refer the buyer to another agent
  • Apply tools to create a good first impression;
  • Learn the importance of reading the buyer;
  • Differentiate between ways to build rapport and ways to tear it down; Compose the correct words to help make a sale
  • Organize and present a buyer’s package;
  • Identify the components of a buyer’s package that will assist the buyer; Recognize successful techniques for presenting the buyer’s package
  • Explain how to answer five major agency objections; Practice the five “A’s” of agency;
  • Differentiate between a ‘customer’ and a ‘client’;
  • Discuss the importance of an agency agreement
  • Analyze what to look for when purchasing a spec home; Explain what curb appeal is and its importance in selling/buying a home; Focus on amenities listed on the buyer’s Wish List
  • Identify the amenities in a home that are most important to the buyer; Recognize which properties have the perks that a buyer will value; Interpret the consequences of misinforming buyers; Apply the best advice an agent can give a buyer
  • Recognize general contract do’s and don’ts;
  • Demonstrate when to use exhibits and amendments; Explain how ‘stipulations’ prevail in a contract
  • Itemize a closing checklist; Organize what needs to be brought to closing; Predict the agent’s after closing responsibilities; Construct a follow – up system
  • Evaluate the benefits of giving thank you gifts and how they relate to business; Construct a follow – up system to ensure buyers for life; Follow a plan to become referral minded; Recognize the four ways to measure success; Construct a Buyer Satisfaction Survey and demonstrate its importance; Discuss ways building lifelong relationships with buyers can help your career;
  • Organize a follow up system for keeping in contact with buyers; Explain how to ask for referrals
6 $60

Course Description

Bad Loans will delve into predatory lending practices and common mortgage fraud schemes. Students will learn to identify and avoid predatory lenders’ and fraud perpetrators’ tactics. The course examines the lines on mortgage forms, good faith estimates, fees, discounts, prepayment penalties, and how these items are used by predatory lenders. This course also features valuable information about dealing with issues such as late charges, tax reserves, property insurance, foreclosures, and note modification. Then students will explore popular mortgage fraud schemes and examples from real cases. Fraud tools such as flipping, straw sellers and buyers, “No Doc” loans, silent second mortgages, and false money will also be discussed.

Content Outline:

Predatory Lending: Part 1
Predatory Lending: Part 2
Predatory Lending: Part 3
Mortgage Fraud: Part 1
Mortgage Fraud: Part 2
Mortgage Fraud: Part 3
Mortgage Fraud: Part 4.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe how to avoid being burned when borrowing money; Discuss how to avoid tricks, scams, plots, schemes and deceptions; Illustrate how unscrupulous lenders get you to sign on the dotted line
  • Explain each line on forms used in mortgage lending; Identify fees & discounts and how they’re used by predatory lenders; Describe the Truth – In – Lending Act; Define prepayment penalties, assumptions, and promissory notes used in mortgage lending
  • Illustrate how to communicate with a loan officer;
  • Demonstrate how to deal with issues such as late charges, tax reserves, property insurance, foreclosures, and note modification; List common predatory lending practices; Indicate the borrowers who are more likely to be the target of predatory lending; Identify the areas where scams are more likely to occur; Recognize popular predatory lending techniques
  • Recognize when a property is being illegally flipped; Identify when straw sellers and straw buyers are being used to commit fraud; Interpret the legal use of a quitclaim deed
  • Recognize fraud using shell companies as straw buyers; Predict the need for an escrow account when repairs need to be made to a
  • property; Recognize when straw buyers are used to obtain “No Doc” loans; Describe how straw buyers use false ID to obtain forgiving second mortgages; Discuss the importance of disclosing a silent second mortgage
  • Explain how straws obtain false money; Illustrate how fraud occurs without an attorney at closing; Describe how “flipping a neighborhood” works; Recognize fake comparables
  • Evaluate how perpetrators move money out of deals to themselves; Identify when false documents are being used, such as HUD – 1, quitclaim, and security deeds; Discuss how bankruptcy is used to avoid foreclosure

7 lesson assessments
1 post assessment.

3 $30

State Approval Number: 44928

Asset Management will provide insight into decision – making techniques used in choosing a strategy to maximize the value of an income – producing property. Real estate agents who deal with residential/commercial property investments will benefit from this introductory course on asset management.

Course objectives in this course are:
Asset Management Essentials,
Case Study: San Felipe Court
Assumptions
Buying vs. Leasing
Distressed Property
Bad investment Decisions
.

3 $30

This package contains the following courses.

Course#: Course Name:

44928 Asset Management
53583 Fair Housing
53582 Environmental Hazards
52049 Using the Internet to Serve Clients
52050 Tax – favorable Real Estate Transactions
44933 Contracts, Purchase & Sales Agreements
60724 Qualifying: Buyer and Property
.

24 $99

Section 1031 of the Internal Revenue Code allows for a tax deferment on the exchange of “like kind” income – producing property. In essence, an individual may trade an old income – producing or commercial capital asset for a new one of “like kind” without paying tax on any of the gains. Instead, the tax is deferred until the chain of exchanges is permanently broken.

Commercial real property can qualify for a tax – deferred exchange, providing that the transaction is properly managed through the cooperation of many different professionals. This module outlines the uses of 1031 exchanges, covering what constitutes exchangeable property, the definition of “like kind,” the roles of different professionals in 1031 exchanges, the benefits and drawbacks, as well as the different types of exchanges commonly used for real estate transactions.

A real estate professional familiar with the Section 1031, its meaning, use and scope, will be able to expand his or her clientele base and will be better equipped to advise investor and commercial clients over the course of their transactions, from the property finding phase through closing.

3 $30

Course Description

Setting goals and eliminating barriers to success is just the beginning of the transformation from eking out a living to a lucrative business. Licensees are presented with key models and systems that will assist in increasing their business growth exponentially. Students will gain an understanding of the fundamental principles of a real estate business, measuring performance quantitatively, mastering four key models that will allow them to operate at a higher level of success and continuing to grow and expand one’s real estate business without artificial limits.

Content Outline:

Charting the Course
Six ‘Mythunderstandings’ Between You and High Achievement
The Nine Ways the Millionaire Real Estate Agent Thinks: Part I
The Nine Ways the Millionaire Real Estate Agent Thinks: Part II
Earn a Million: Part I
Earn a Million: Part II
Earn a Million: Part III
Net a Million
Receive a Million.

Learning Objectives

  • Summarize how success can be achieved; Discuss the importance of goal setting; Explain how to implement effective foundational models; Diagram how to break through the achievement ceiling; Describe the three L’s of a real estate agent; Identify the four stages of growth
  • Identify the six myths about high achievement; Recall six truths about success in real estate
  • Identify the six myths about high achievement; Recall six truths about success in real estate Identify the six myths about high achievement; Recall six truths about success in real estate
  • Discuss the ways a millionaire real estate agent thinks; Demonstrate how to think competitively and strategically; Indicate the basic difference between low achievers and high achievers; Recall the importance of standards; Summarize the three levels of the service approach; Explain the 80: 20 Rule; Differentiate between lead generation and lead receiving; Analyze the virtues of seller listings; List the eight goal categories of the millionaire real estate agent
  • Explain the economic model and how it pertains to real estate success; Demonstrate how to use the Lead Generation Model, including prospecting and marketing, database marketing, systematic marketing, and how to focus on listing
  • Summarize the three key areas of the Budget Model; Discuss the three key areas of the Organizational Model; Review the four models
  • Demonstrate a millionaire’s view on each of the four models; Discuss a real estate agent’s cost of sales and operating expenses; Explain the millionaire agent lead generation model; Diagram the budget model; Summarize the three areas of staffing; Compare the nine major compensation options
  • Differentiate between earning and netting a million;
  • Discuss the importance of a lead generation program; Calculate the minimum number of seller listings that must be listed each month; Explain the systems documentation model of the millionaire real estate agent; Identify how to create teamwork; Summarize ways to control costs
  • List the four issues of receive a million; Explain how to work on the business, not in the business; Differentiate between active and passive income; Indicate the three key hires and their roles and responsibilities; Discuss the importance of accountability; Recall the five simple steps for putting it all together; Summarize the Millionaire Real Estate Energy Plan

9 lesson assessments
1 post assessment.

6 $60

Course Description

Thousands of times every day real estate licensees influence choices that home buyers and sellers make about the homes, neighborhoods, and the communities in which they live. Those who take particular care to acknowledge and demonstrate the importance of efficient, well built homes, and conservation are helping to make these desirable properties and communities more available and more valuable. Water Resources is one in a series of courses involving human ecology. Special attention is given to global water systems, water usage, the effect on the world’s population, pollution, water quality standards, wetland protection, and the importance of conservation with the strategies for achieving these goals.

Content Outline:

  • Global and U.S. Water Use
  • Global Population Growth and Statistics
  • Environmental History and Legislation
  • Natural Wetlands
  • Oceans
  • Floods

Learning Objectives

  • Analyze and put current global and U.S. water use in the context of water supply; Discuss the Ogallala aquifer depletion, irrigation efficiency, and the effects of irrigation subsidies on irrigation efficiency
  • Evaluate global population growth in perspective; Illustrate statistics involving proportion living near a coast and immigration to the U.S.; Discuss physical properties of water, water distribution, and movement around the world
  • Diagram the history of the environmental movement in the U.S. and the genesis of environmental legislation; Illustrate point and non – point sources of water pollution; Summarize water quality standards
  • Discuss natural wetlands, their distribution, history, and ecological value; Explain wetland protection; Contrast constructed wetlands and their applications with natural wetlands; Relate wellhead protection programs with emphasis on source water assessments
  • Summarize basic information about the world’s oceans and their zonation; Discuss the 2003 report of the Pew Oceans Commission on the state of U.S. oceans; Recognize the variety of coastal and marine environmental problems that are accumulating; Explain the ecological and economic importance of our coastal and marine
  • environments; Describe new ocean governance and a new ocean ethic, coastal zone management efforts, tsunamis Explain impacts of watershed; Summarize the National Flood Insurance Program Plan; Identify, and tsunami hazard mitigation
  • Discuss the topic of floods; water conservation strategies
3 $30

APPROVED FOR:

  • 4 HOURS CE CREDIT

Course Description:
In this module students will learn about the Internet and how it has affected the real estate industry. Students will also learn about the elements of websites and how to market themselves and their sites on the Internet. The final lesson teaches students to communicate effectively over e – mail.

The conclusion of this module presents real world dilemmas and applications of the information presented. As the student completes this module, he or she should try to paint a big picture of Internet issues, which the module will address with comprehensive content questions, practices and case studies.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  • Understand the effects of disintermediation on real – estate professionals
  • Be able to explain the issues that apply to Internet Data Exchange and Virtual Office Websites
  • Have increased knowledge about the basic components of and terms related to the Internet
  • Know how to generate contacts through the development of an effective website
  • Evaluate and be able to implement Internet marketing methods
  • Understand important guidelines for writing emails that will help generate effective dialogues

TOPICS COVERED:

  • LESSON 1: Overview of the Internet
  • LESSON 2: Effects on the Real Estate Industry
  • LESSON 3: Websites
  • LESSON 4: Marketing on the Internet
  • LESSON 5: Email
  • LESSON 6: Real Estate Practice

REGULATORY REQUIREMENT:
Please see the state/regulatory requirement from the course catalog page.

SEAT TIME:
This course has been approved for 4 hours.

COURSE PRE – REQUISITE:
N/A.

TESTING:
Quizzes – All quizzes must be taken to proceed forward to the next lesson.
Final Exam – You will be required to take a final exam.

COURSE COMPLETION:
Print your certificate and provide a copy for your broker as evidence of completing the course. Retain a copy of the certificate for your records.

.

4 $40

Course Description

This course provides the student with an overview of the home loan process. Students will learn how to fill out a loan application and what information lenders require. Elements of conventional financing, loan – to – value ratios, and private mortgage insurance will be discussed. Then students will explore commercial loan products, construction loans, special purpose loans, and the loan needs of farmers and ranchers. The course also examines various kinds of alternative financing, adjustable rate mortgages, FHA and VA loans, purchase money mortgages, wrap – around financing, land contracts, lease/option plans, and other types of creative financing.

Content Outline:

The Loan Process
Conventional Financing: Part 1
Conventional Financing: Part 2
Commercial Loans: Part 1
Commercial Loans: Part 2
Alternative Financing: Part 1
Alternative Financing: Part 2
Alternative Financing: Part 3
FHA Loans
VA Loans
Purchase Money Financing
Land Contracts
Other Forms of Creative Financing.

Learning Objectives

  • List the four steps that make up the loan process; Illustrate how to fill out a typical loan application; Recall what information is required for lenders
  • Explain the functioning of conventional financing; Differentiate between amortized, partially amortized, and interest – only loans; Describe the standard for loans with less than 80% loan – to – value ratios; Explain the relationship between secondary financing and conventional loans
  • Explain the functioning of private mortgage insurance and its requirements; Describe the standard for loans with more than 90% loan – to – value ratios; Recognize what could potentially happen if one assumes the need for conventional loans
  • Define and list various commercial loan products; Recognize various financial statements and their relevance to the commercial loan process; Describe land loans, their requirements, and processing; Explain residential construction loans and their special issues
  • Define and list the various special – purpose buildings, and recognize the special loan requirements for each; Describe various lease instruments used commercially; Summarize how the special needs of farmers and ranchers are met by the commercial loan industry
  • Explain the use of discount points and their relationship to alternative financing; Describe how buy – down plans reduce interest and lower loan payments; State the limits and guidelines imposed on buy – down plans
  • Define adjustable rate mortgages; List the elements of an ARM loan; State the guidelines for ARM loans; Recall the disclosures that must be made for ARM loans; Predict the kinds of questions asked concerning ARM financing
  • Explain the functioning of growth equity mortgages; Describe and differentiate between a reduction option mortgage and bi – weekly loans; Define and list the various types of home equity conversion mortgages
  • Explain the function of Federal Housing Administration loans; List the features and characteristics of an FHA loan; State the requirements for an FHA loan; Describe the different FHA loan programs available
  • Explain the function of Veteran Administration loans; List and recall the VA Guaranty characteristics; Recall the process for qualification for a VA loan
  • Recognize the reasons for using seller financing; Define and describe purchase money mortgages; Describe the usage of purchase money financing on unencumbered and encumbered properties; Explain the usage for assumption and wrap – around financing
  • Define land contracts; Explain the usage for the three types of land contracts
  • List and explain the usage of other forms of creative financing; Explain the workings of a lease/option plan; State the responsibilities for brokers and agents involved with creative financing

13 lesson assessments
1 post assessment.

6 $60

This course discusses the application of current tax advantages of using both qualified and non – qualified tax products such as IRAã¢??s, SEP IRA, 401k, Roth IRAs and charitable gift annuities. The use of these applications will provide the real estate professional with the opportunity to create a long standing and profitable relationship with his or her clients, as well as attracting a more sophisticated investor wishing to find an alternative to 1031 exchanges.

4 $40

Course Description

Real estate mathematics can be very daunting and confusing. However, by beginning with a review of basic math skills and reinforcing what is already known, students will soon learn to apply real estate terminology and specific formulas to problems and tasks common in the real estate industry such as area and volume calculation, the Rectangular Survey System, the Metes and Bounds System, proration, commission rates, and property values. This course will help students develop the skills to complete a review of settlement costs and explain this information to clients.

Content Outline:

  • Fractions and Percentages
  • Formulas
  • Real Estate Financing Problems
  • Prorations
  • Measurements and Survey Systems

Learning Objectives

  • Identify terminology that is used in typical real estate mathematics problems; Add, subtract, multiply, and divide fractions, as well as change percents and decimals to fractions
  • Identify terminology that is used in typical real estate mathematics problems; Follow the important steps in solving math problems; Determine what formula to use to solve a real estate math problem; Use the memory formula to find the correct operation to solve a problem; Describe depreciation; Measure the reduction in the value of properties using the straight line depreciation method
  • Explain principles central to real estate financing; Define principal and interest; Summarize the concept of amortization; Calculate the interest on a loan; Solve profit and loss problems
  • Solve proration problems that a real estate professional typically comes across when closing transactions; Determine commission rates and calculate property values
  • Differentiate between the four legal means of describing a property; Determine property locations and parcel size from a rectangular survey description; Use formulas to calculate area and volume of land and buildings
5 $50

Course Description

This property management course focuses on the operational aspects of running a property management firm. Students will learn how to analyze and manage liability risks and insurance and the security and safety responsibilities of a property manager. The course discusses the pros and cons of private maintenance companies, setting up a maintenance system, evaluating a property’s maintenance needs, and common maintenance problems that property managers deal with. Proper recordkeeping, promotion, and advertising are also covered. This course teaches students how to handle problem tenants, complaints, waiting lists, late rent, evictions, fair housing issues, and owner relations. The course also contains valuable information about the organization of a property management office, creating policy manuals, management costs and fees, the hiring process, employee management and evaluation, and what it takes to open and maintain a successful property management firm.

Content Outline:

  • Liability and Risk Management: Part I
  • Liability and Risk Management: Part 2
  • Security and Safety: Part I
  • Security and Safety: Part 2
  • Maintenance and Energy Conservation: Part I
  • Maintenance and Energy Conservation: Part 2
  • Records and Controls: Part I
  • Records and Controls: Part 2
  • Promotion and Advertising: Part I
  • Promotion and Advertising: Part 2
  • Tenant Relations
  • Fair Housing and Ethics
  • Owner Relations
  • Management Operations: Part I
  • Management Operations: Part 2

Learning Objectives

  • Explain liability regarding personal injury and property loss that goes with property ownership and management; Summarize other risks that owners, tenants, and managers are exposed to; Evaluate the management decisions involving risk; Describe how risk can be transferred to others using insurance; Identify various types of insurance protection available
  • Identify various types of insurance protection available for the tenant and property manager; Evaluate how much insurance is enough
  • Describe a property manager’s security obligations to protect tenants; Identify what type of lighting increases security; Recall which types of landscaping, fences, and walls deter intrusions; Indicate the door and lock features that best prevent crime; Discuss the security issues regarding windows; Summarize the advantages and disadvantages of electronic gates and guard services
  • Identify the different types of alarms; List the security issues involving rent collection and showing units; Describe which safety devices are required by your local fire and safety codes; Explain the safety requirements of the Occupational Safety and Heath Act, and how it applies to property management
  • Evaluate the basis of making decisions regarding the use of employees or contract providers for maintenance work; Describe the importance of privatizing maintenance tasks, setting specifications, and striving for standardization
  • Define the specific maintenance problems which a property manager can expect to encounter, as well as the corrective measures that are likely to be appropriate; Evaluate the importance of the difference between repairs and improvements; Explain a preliminary energy audit of a property, and recommend how energy and water can be conserved
  • Describe the requirements for handling trust fund accounts; and Identify which records to present to your client and which ones to keep
  • Describe the forms used in property management; Evaluate the importance of accurate record keeping
  • Demonstrate how to enhance your firm, as well as personal image, to help you in obtaining management contracts; List sources you can use to locate management opportunities
  • Compare the various methods of promoting rental space; Discuss the use of advertising tools such as signs, the Internet, and billboards; Recall how to compose classified ads and select the appropriate newspaper; List alternative marketing tools
  • Recognize the importance of educating a tenant about lease clauses and occupancy rules; Explain the dangers of renting to friends or relatives, or having a romantic entanglement with a tenant; Identify the importance of properly handling problem tenants and tenant complaints and what you can learn from them; Summarize how to handle tenant waiting lists as well as the tenant’s right to make repairs and deduct the cost from rent; Evaluate how to handle late rent, tenant absences, the death of a tenant, and changing the terms of tenancy; List the step in the eviction process and prohibited practices
  • Describe the various civil rights laws, and, in particular, their applicability to property management; Define the prohibitions under fair housing laws; Identify the importance of the Americans With Disabilities Act and the Equal Credit Opportunity Act; Discuss the importance of ethics and the ability to analyze a situation from an ethical viewpoint
  • Explain the necessity of effective owner/manager communications; List the fiduciary duties a manager has to an owner; Identify the dangers of romantic relations with tenants; Describe how to be courteous and neutral to internal politics when dealing with homeowner’s association members
  • Analyze the organization of a management office and staffing requirements; Discuss the importance of having a policy manual; Explain the economics of scale and how size relates to the costs of management and how fees are calculated; Identify the status of a resident manager, the attributes of a good manager, a resident manager’s duties, and common managerial problems; Evaluate the hiring process and the importance of a job application and employee interview; Relate how to deal with immigration issues
  • List what should be included in an employee file; Summarize the employee evaluation process; Discuss important issues regarding employee relations; Recall ways to retain employees; Describe in – house training of employees and the utilization of professional organizations for training; Identify firing procedures and problems; Evaluate what it will take to open and maintain a successful property management office
8 $80

Course Description

Students will be introduced to the concepts, types, and approaches to value. They will learn about market value; selecting the best comparables when estimating real property value; and accurately determining square footage. This course addresses how to correctly make adjustments to value, market timing, and the reasoning and strategies as to why property sells.

Content Outline:

  • Valuation
  • Comparative Market Analysis
  • Replacement Value
  • Income – Capitalization Approach
  • Cost Approach
  • Comparables

Learning Objectives

  • Compare and contrast the three approaches to valuation; Describe the purposes and content of a comparative market analysis (CMA); Explain what comparables are used for and which to select when estimating real property value
  • Analyze the factors affecting cost, price, and value; Identify the four characteristics necessary for real property to have value; Define key terms
  • Estimate the value of properties using the cost method approach; Differentiate between the three forms of depreciation; Describe how replacement cost is determined
  • Describe the income – capitalization approach to appraising the value of income – producing properties; Use the capitalization formula to calculate the value of a property; Explain the derivation of net operating income and how capitalization rates are calculated; Apply the gross rent multiplier
  • Define the three classic approaches to value; and Explain a cost approach appraisal and when it is used.
  • Describe a sales comparison approach appraisal; Follow the guidelines for when selecting comparable property; and Apply the “two in, one out rule.”

6 lesson assessments
1 post assessment.

4 $40

Course Description

The goal of this course is to provide licensees with an understanding of various relocation service requirements. Providing relocation services involves working simultaneously for two different clients with two distinctively different service requirements, some of which overlap. This course explores corporate relocation policies, tax issues, relocation management companies and the services they provide, home sale programs, corporate listings, RMC guidelines, and Worldwide ERC.

Content Outline:

  • A Profession of Service: Part 1
  • A Profession of Service: Part 2
  • A Profession of Service: Part 3
  • Preparing For Management: Part 1
  • Preparing For Management: Part 2
  • Leases and Leasing: Part 1
  • Leases and Leasing: Part 2
  • Lease Clauses
  • A Continuation of Lease Clauses
  • Residential Property
  • Management: Part 1
  • Residential Property Management: Part 2
  • Commercial Property Management
  • Office Property Management
  • Industrial Property Management and Special
  • Properties
  • Special Management Situations: Part 1
  • Special Management Situations: Part 2
  • Special Management Situations: Part 3
  • Liability and Risk Management: Part 1
  • Liability and Risk Management: Part 2
  • Security and Safety: Part 1
  • Security and Safety: Part 2
  • Maintenance and Energy Conservation: Part 1
  • Maintenance and Energy Conservation: Part 2
  • Records and Controls: Part 1
  • Records and Controls: Part 2
  • Promotion and Advertising: Part 1
  • Promotion and Advertising: Part 2
  • Tenant Relations
  • Fair Housing and Ethics
  • Owner Relations
  • Management Operations: Part 1
  • Management Operations: Part 2

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the historical background of property management that has led to the present career opportunities in this field of service; Explain why owners choose professional property management; Evaluate how professional management can meet owner needs and goals
  • Describe what it takes to make a successful property manager; Evaluate how your personal attributes fit with those necessary for success
  • Explain how preparation and education are lifetime activities; Evaluate how professional organizations can aid your career growth
  • Describe the benefits of ownership and how owner goals relate to a management plan; Analyze a property, including the changes in operation and physical aspects recommended to best maximize owner benefits; Evaluate when to refuse property management opportunities; Indicate when negative aspects will outweigh fees and commissions
  • Evaluate the relevance of the various contractual provisions; Recognize when property management contracts can be terminated with and without further obligation; Discuss the necessity of having a takeover checklist; Explain the necessity of obtaining documents and information upon procuring a management contract
  • Define what a lease is and the requirements of all types of leases; Evaluate the difference between assignment of a lease and subleasing
  • Discuss the process of qualifying prospective tenants and the process; Identify the role of the property manager in drafting leases and the dangers in using lessee prepared leases; Evaluate the dangers and benefits as to the length of leases; Demonstrate how to reach a win/win objective in lease negotiations; Describe the required disclosures
  • Describe the different lease clauses and what they mean, and their applicability to the specific needs of lessors and lessees; Identify what can be included in a lease
  • Explain the different lease clauses and what they mean, and their applicability to the specific needs of lessors and lessees; Describe what can be included in a lease
  • Define what should be included in a residential property management contract; Discuss the necessity of developing policies for managing a residential property
  • Analyze rents in a community to make informed decisions as to economic adjustments; Explain how to prepare a property for lease, the pre – qualifications and qualification process, showing the property, obtaining the lease application, and getting the lease signed; Describe lessor disclosure requirements, and both tenant and lessor obligations; Identify the necessity of rent collection procedures and the process of eviction, as well as how to handle tenant problems and use charges
  • Explain how commercial management differs from residential property management, as well as management concerns; Evaluate leases tailored to commercial management; Describe commercial property from the viewpoint of the owner, manager, and tenant
  • Evaluate how office management differs from residential property management, as well as management concerns; Recognize leases tailored to office management; Define office property from the viewpoint of the owner, manager, and tenant
  • Explain how industrial management differs from residential property management, as well as management concerns; Analyze leases tailored to industrial management; Describe industrial property from the viewpoint of the owner, manager, and tenant; Discuss specialized uses of property management from a management perspective;
  • Define a single – room occupancy (SRO)
  • Describe the issues unique to the management of condominiums; Summarize other special management situations involving resort areas;
  • Compare the specialized residential management of single – family dwellings and short – term properties
  • Describe the features offered by elderly housing facilities; List the special issues involved in managing housing for the elderly; Recall the housing facilities offered by federal, state, and local governmental institutions; and Discuss the problems (their solutions) of subsidized housing.
  • Describe time share properties and the management duties and problem areas associated with them; List the issues involved with the management of mobile home and RV parks; Relate the factors involved in agricultural property management; Identify the management skills and duties required when managing dock facilities; Summarize the special issues involved in the management of other properties such as medical offices, mini – storage facilities, and storage yards
  • Explain liability regarding personal injury and property loss that goes with property ownership and management; Summarize other risks that owners, tenants, and managers are exposed to; Evaluate the management decisions involving risk; Describe how risk can be transferred to others using insurance; and Identify various types of insurance protection available
  • Identify various types of insurance protection available for the tenant, property manager, and owner; Evaluate how much insurance is enough
  • Describe a property manager’s security obligations to protect tenants; Identify what type of lighting increases security; Recall which types of landscaping, fences, and walls deter intrusions; Indicate the door and lock features that best prevent crime; Discuss the security issues regarding windows; Summarize the advantages and disadvantages of electronic gates and guard services
  • Identify the different types of alarms; List the security issues involving rent collection and showing units; Describe which safety devices are required by your local fire and safety codes; Explain the safety requirements of the Occupational Safety and Heath Act, and how it
  • applies to property management
  • Evaluate the basis of making decisions regarding the use of employees or contract providers for maintenance work; Describe the importance of privatizing maintenance tasks, setting specifications, and striving for standardization
  • Define the specific maintenance problems which a property manager can expect to encounter, as well as the corrective measures that are likely to be appropriate; Evaluate the importance of the difference between repairs and improvements;
  • Explain a preliminary energy audit of a property, and recommend how energy and water can be conserved
  • Describe the requirements for handling trust fund accounts; Identify which records to present to your client and which ones to keep
  • Describe the forms used in property management;
  • Evaluate the importance of accurate record keeping
  • Demonstrate how to enhance your firm, as well as personal image, to help you in obtaining management contracts; List sources you can use to locate management opportunities
  • Compare the various methods of promoting rental space; Discuss the use of advertising tools such as signs, the Internet, and billboards; Recall how to compose classified ads and select the appropriate newspaper; List alternative marketing tools
  • Recognize the importance of educating a tenant about lease clauses and occupancy rules; Explain the dangers of renting to friends or relatives, or having a romantic entanglement with a tenant; Identify the importance of properly handling problem tenants and tenant complaints and what you can learn from them; Summarize how to handle tenant waiting lists as well as the tenant’s right to make repairs and deduct the cost from rent; Evaluate how to handle late rent, tenant absences, the death of a tenant, and changing the terms of tenancy; List the step in the eviction process and prohibited practices
  • Describe the various civil rights laws, and, in particular, their applicability to property management; Define the prohibitions under fair housing laws; Identify the importance of the Americans With Disabilities Act and the Equal Credit Opportunity Act; Discuss the importance of ethics and the ability to analyze a situation from an ethical viewpoint
  • Explain the necessity of effective owner/manager communications; List the fiduciary duties a manager has to an owner; Identify the dangers of romantic relations with tenants; Describe how to be courteous and neutral to internal politics when dealing with homeowners association members
  • Analyze the organization of a management office and staffing requirements; Discuss the importance of having a policy manual; Explain the economics of scale and how size relates to the costs of management and how fees are calculated; Identify the status of a resident manager, the attributes of a good manager, a resident manager’s duties, and common managerial problems; Evaluate the hiring process and the importance of a job application and employee interview; Relate how to deal with immigration issues
  • List what should be included in an employee file; Summarize the employee evaluation process; Discuss important issues regarding employee relations; Recall ways to retain employees; Describe in – house training of employees and the utilization of professional organizations for training; Identify firing procedures and problems; Evaluate what it will take to open and maintain a successful property management office
15 $150

Course Description

The goal of this course is to provide licensees with an understanding of various relocation service requirements. Providing relocation services involves working simultaneously for two different clients with two distinctively different service requirements, some of which overlap. This course explores corporate relocation policies, tax issues, relocation management companies and the services they provide, home sale programs, corporate listings, RMC guidelines, and Worldwide ERC.

Content Outline:

  • An Introduction to Corporate Relocation Transactions
  • Corporate Relocation Policies and Tax Issues
  • RMCs and Home Sale Programs
  • Amended Value Sales and Buyer Value Option
  • Corporate Listings and Guidelines for RMC – Controlled Sales
  • Referral Fees and Worldwide ERC®

Learning Objectives

  • Define important relocation terms; Describe a corporate relocation company; Differentiate corporate moves and self – directed moves
  • List the primary objectives of a corporate relocation policy; Describe the services and benefits for the employee and the employer that a sound corporate relocation policy offers; Demonstrate the professional conduct guidelines for licensees that relocation management companies expect; Discuss tax issues involved in many corporate relocations
  • Describe the services that relocation management companies typically provide for their clients; List and discuss the various relocation home sale programs employers may offer to their employees; Explain a Guaranteed Purchase Offer; Identify the tax implications for the relocation home sale programs
  • Explain an Amended Value Sale and the challenges it may present for a real estate agent; List the 11 Key Elements and Procedures of an Amended Value Option; Discuss Buyer Value Options and the associated advantages
  • Discuss the legal differences between corporate listings and regular listings; List the functional differences between corporate listings and regular listings; Apply licensee guidelines for relocation management company transactions
  • Discuss referral fees in relocation transactions; Summarize how different professionals in an employee relocation transaction may view referral fees; Describe issues concerning after – the – fact referral fee requests; Identify the role and goals of the Worldwide ERC® Coalition; List the benefits of affinity groups; Discuss the Employee Relocation Council (ERC) and the professional designations offered to relocation professionals
3 $30

Course Description

Human land use is one in a series of courses covering the many areas of Human Ecology. The emphasis here is to impart knowledge and understanding of the history of land use, ownership, controls, zoning, boundaries, view shed analysis, geology, land use conflicts, court decisions affecting land use, and the relationship between human quality of life and land ownership.

Content Outline:

Land Use Controls: Part I
Land Use Controls: Part II
Land Description and Analysis: Part I
Land Description and Analysis: Part II
Land Description and Analysis: Part III
Land Use and Conflicts:
Part I
Land Use Conflicts: Part II
Land Use Conflicts: Part III.

Learning Objectives

  • Define land and land use; Explain the four powers reserved by the state (taxation, escheat, eminent domain, and police power); Describe the various forms of ownership; Define taking; Explain the public control of land use; Summarize the history of land use regulation
  • Identify important court decisions affecting land use controls; Discuss the applications and effects of zoning on land use
  • Recall the current methods of describing and analyzing a property for any of a variety of uses; Define the boundaries of a property; Discuss site programming, analysis of site context and surrounding land use, and viewshed analysis; Differentiate between climate and weather; Identify sources of climate and weather information
  • Explain microclimate; Recognize the importance of water resources and watershed planning; Summarize the provisions of legislation regarding water pollution, public water systems, watershed planning
  • Discuss the importance of geology in the real estate profession; Summarize geologic hazards and natural disasters and their effects on land use; Explain to uses of soil surveys in the real estate industry
  • Explain the concept of highest and best use in the context of global sustainability; Identify the three essential elements of productive order in a sustainable human ecosystem; Describe the impact of mineral extraction and processing industries on ecosystems and land use
  • Discuss agricultural land use; Identify the impact of the world population and food supply on land use; Describe the effects of the world’s water shortage on the real estate industry; Explain global warming and its effects
  • Explain the problem of soil erosion; Discuss the challenges of farmland conversion; Describe growth management strategies; Summarize the New Urbanism and Smart Growth movements; Explain how land use affects real estate and quality of life

8 lesson assessments
1 post assessment.

4 $40

Course Description

Human land use is one in a series of courses covering the many areas of Human Ecology. The emphasis here is to impart knowledge and understanding of the history of land use, ownership, controls, zoning, boundaries, view shed analysis, geology, land use conflicts, court decisions affecting land use, and the relationship between human quality of life and land ownership.

Content Outline:

  • Introduction to Common Interest Developments
  • Buying a Unit in a Common Interest Development
  • The Manager’s Role at a Board Meeting
  • How Board Meetings Work
  • The Board of Directors
  • Association Meetings
  • Voting
  • Homeowner’s Association Restrictions: Part 1
  • Homeowner’s Association Restrictions: Part 2
  • Enforcement of Covenants and Restrictions
  • Inspection Rights of Members
  • Changing the Governing Documents
  • Financial Management of a Homeowner’s Association
  • Summary of Homeowner’s Association Reserves
  • Assessments by the Association
  • Enforcing Assessment Liens
  • Association Contracts
  • Statute of Frauds
  • Contracting through Agents
  • Discrimination in Employment Contracts
  • Property and Liability Insurance
  • Over – the – air Reception Devices
  • Law and the Courts
  • Alternative Dispute Resolution

Learning Objectives

  • Differentiate between “separate interest” and “common area”; Understand what is included in the purchase of a condominium; Explain the importance of a homeowner or community association
  • Explain what disclosures the seller must make to the buyer; Understand what a buyer is getting in a ‘separate interest’; Understand what is included in ‘common areas’; Describe what is owned, i.e. walls, appliances, plumbing, wiring, etc.; Predict when a homeowner’s association charges a fee to the seller
  • Relate the role of the board of directors in a homeowner association; Describe the set up of the board: quorum, length of term, nominations, when the board meets; Discuss when and how to give notice of meetings and the legalities involved
  • Explain the function of the board of directors;
  • Discuss the contributions the manager makes to board of directors meeting; Implement the basics of effective parliamentary procedure; Describe how motions are made and votes are taken;
  • Demonstrate how accurate minutes of the meeting should be kept
  • Describe the authority of the board of directors;
  • Evaluate the business judgment rule; Recognize the need for liability insurance for the association and board; Explain statute of limitations; Recognize when conflict of interest occurs.
  • Define membership rights; Explain how notice is given of membership meetings; Recall what constitutes a quorum, how it is established and its importance; Differentiate between association membership and the association itself
  • Analyze voting by proxy and how it can be used to help the association; Describe written ballot issues, distribution and problems; Recall the role of inspectors of election on the outcome of a vote
  • Discuss reasons common interest developments have restrictions: pets, architectural,
  • landscape and appearance; classify covenants and covenants running with the land; Explain restrictions on solar collectors; Describe solar easements
  • Apply traffic enforcement within the common interest development; Evaluate state vehicle codes for sections that pertain to your development;
  • Evaluate current use restrictions within the development for possible changes
  • Illustrate the CC&Rs needed to enforce the declaration; Analyze state and local laws to know when law enforcement is the responsibility of the association; Explain the litigation process: lawsuits, hearings, fines and arbitration
  • Evaluate what records the association is required to have in its office: financial books, minutes,
  • articles and bylaws; Recall who can inspect the membership records; Analyze the inspection rights of directors
  • Interpret the appropriate time to make changes to the governing documents; List which documents can be changed; Identify the method for making those changes: delivery, voting, adoption; Construct the steps needed to change the operating rules
  • Analyze the requirements that must be met for financial disclosure; Describe the components of a required operating budget; Identify operating expenses: insurance; utilities; fees; maintenance;
  • Relate the importance of improvement expenses
  • Identify a reserve account and its use; Conduct a major component analysis, including remaining life of the components; Describe how reserve funds are acquired; Determine the assessment income from expenses; Illustrate what the Financial Statement should contain
  • Understand that assessments are payments for operating expenses of the common areas of the development; Explain the process for increasing assessments and notification; Describe when special assessments and emergency assessments are needed; Discuss how to collect assessments and when they are due
  • Describe the contents of a pre – lien notice; Analyze the owner’s response; Discuss the appropriate time to proceed with foreclosure; Recognize when dispute resolution could be an appropriate resolution; Identify when a notice of sale and subsequent sale are needed; Relate the steps the association needs to take in the case of property owner bankruptcy
  • Illustrate the types of contracts Homeowner Associations may enter into: express, implied,
  • quasi, executed, executory, bilateral and
  • unilateral; Differentiate between an offeror and an offeree; Describe how to terminate a contract
  • Define Statute of Limitations; Recognize mistakes in contracts: mistake of fact; mutual mistake, unilateral mistake, clerical or computational error, mistake of judgment; Describe actual fraud; Identify contractual conditions; Estimate “reasonable period of time”
  • Analyze when to enter into a contract for outside management; Differentiate between employee and agent; Identify who has the authority to bind the association to contracts; Predict the employee’s liability for actions of independent contractors;
  • Evaluate the best time for and method of termination
  • Identify discriminatory practices in employment contracts; Describe the effect of Americans with Disabilities Act on employment; Discuss Title VII of the Civil Rights Act violations; Relate the Federal Housing act to your role as manager
  • Differentiate between real and personal property;
  • Explain the types of insurance a Homeowner Association is required to carry
  • Illustrate the Over – the – air Reception Devices Rule and its affect on CIDs; Apply the Petition For Declaratory Ruling
  • Describe the primary sources of law; Illustrate the function of each source of law; Discuss the court system and the various courts in the Federal Court System
  • Discuss the advantages of Alternative Dispute Resolution; Differentiate between non – adjudicative and adjudicative methods; Discuss the ways to negotiate; Recite the five steps of mediation;
  • Demonstrate the procedures of arbitration
12 $120

Course Description

It is not always obvious, especially to the first – time home buyer, the reasoning and importance of the home inspection. Therefore, the real estate licensee must know and understand the basic requirements of the property inspection and the responsibilities of the licensed inspectors. Some of the areas discussed are the basic fundamentals of the exterior components of real property as well as the interior housing construction; the procedure for inspecting heating and cooling systems; and warning signs of potential problem areas including mold and other environmental hazards.

Content Outline:

  • Introduction
  • Structural Elements
  • Roofing and Siding
  • Insulation and Ventilation
  • Heating and Air Conditioning Systems
  • Plumbing and Electrical Wiring
  • Environmental Issues, Part 1
  • Environmental Issues, Part 2
  • Environmental Issues, Part 3

Learning Objectives

  • Identify the kinds of things a home inspector must be knowledgeable about, such as land use restrictions and regulations, zoning regulations, variances, building permits and certificates of occupancy; List the typical items examined by a home inspector on the property itself
  • Discuss the main structure elements of a house; Summarize the parts of a foundation; Explain how floors and walls are constructed; List the common types of house framing
  • Identify signs to look for during a roof inspection that would indicate a problem with its condition; Recognize the kinds of exterior siding that can be found on a home and what the downsides or features are of each; Discuss the problems with EIFS
  • Identify benefits of insulation and ventilation to the structure; Explain how insulation is installed to maximize efficiency; Summarize various roofing materials; Discuss roofing components and their roles in protecting the structure
  • Discuss what to look for when inspecting stairways, patios, porches, fireplaces, chimneys and woodstoves; Describe different types of heating and air conditioning systems and the problems associated with each; Diagram common problem areas often found in kitchens, specifically water leaks and issues with cabinets and counters
  • Recognize the basic plumbing issues associated with hot water heaters, drains, septic systems and water wells; Explain the terms and elements of an electrical system; Summarize the need for inspection of electrical wiring, especially in older residential homes
  • Describe ways in which environmental hazards can affect real estate; List common indoor pollutants; Explain the dangers of formaldehyde in residential housing; Recall the types of asbestos – containing materials commonly found in homes; Discuss sources of lead poisoning; Summarize how groundwater contamination may occur; Indicate the problems caused by underground storage tanks
  • Explain what mold is, the conditions under which it grows, the steps to its prevention, and how to get rid of it; Analyze the health effects of mold exposure; Diagram the steps licensees can take to reduce toxic mold liability; Describe what real estate professionals should do when microbial contamination is suspected on a property
  • Summarize the dangers of meth and meth labs; Recognize a meth lab; List the health effects of exposure to meth lab chemicals; Recall types of toxic wastes; Describe brownfields; Define wetlands
6 $60

State Approval Number: 53583

This course is designed to increase your knowledge of federal and state fair housing laws and related civil rights and anti – discrimination laws that affect real property transactions. All real estate licensees need to understand who is protected by the fair housing laws, what acts are prohibited by these, and how the fair housing laws are enforced.

The more knowledgeable you are about fair housing, the less likely you will be to commit fair housing violations. Course topics covered in this course include transactions covered by the law, discrimination, HUD advertising guidelines, equal housing opportunity, the equal credit opportunity act and the Americans with Disabilities Act.

4 $30

Our real estate CE courses meet the requirements of the Georgia Real Estate Commission (GREC). Take your 24-hour Georgia real estate continuing education now. All licensees who have a license number above 100,000 are required to take continuing education during a four-year renewal period to renew their licenses. A renewal period begins four years prior to the current renewal due date. For instance, your renewal date is March 31, 2006. You must complete your CE requirements between April 1, 2002 and March 31, 2006. All CE courses completed outside the renewal period will not be credited.

Features & Benefits

Unlimited Access

Learn what you want at your own pace and on your own schedule.

Comprehensive Catalog

Over 6,000 online compliance training courses, assessments, and exams.

Multimedia Content

Interactive multimedia courses with instant grading and timely reporting.

Expert Instructors

Learn from top experts who are passionate about their field.

Group Discounts

Get great discounts and save with group enrollment.

24x7 Support

24-hour support for any online course via phone, email or live chat.

Trusted by professionals

We are committed to ensuring a better online learning experience for our students. See why thousands of people chose Online Institute of America to satisfy their online training requirements.



Overall, I think the coursework is great. Everything is explained in simple English and the voiceover is wonderful.

— Lori A. Leonard, IBM


Catherine was terrific and answered all of my questions with great professionalism. Great Job!

— Elizabeth D, Student


Needed assistance getting into my account and Kris set me up. Fast helpful service! Thank you.

— Brian T, Kraft Canada

Read more reviews from our students

Have a question about our online training programs?